Quiz 1 Study Guide

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  • Topic: Blues, Jazz, Muddy Waters
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Quiz I—Study Guide

Format: 5 listening questions (2 points each), 10 multiple choice questions (2 points each), 2 short answer (5 points each)

Listening/Musical Examples—may be played *or* come up in other questions • “Zip Coon,” George Washington Dixon (1828) – minstrelsy overse-chorus form, story song, voice & fiddle
“Jeanie with the Light Brown Hair,” c. Stephen Foster (1854) – parlor song oAABA form (B= new melody), piano & voice
“Maple Leaf Rag,” Scott Joplin (1898) - ragtime
omusically complicated, bass with left hand (steady rhythm w/ beat), right hand plays off beat (syncopation), formal sections • “Come Fly With Me,” Frank Sinatra (1958); Michael Bublé (2003) – crooners oSmooth, deep, voice, sentimentality

“Keep on the Sunny Side,” The Carter Family (1927) - hillbilly oguitar style, first chorus form (has verse & chorus), optimistic lyrics, low pitch • “Crossroad Blues,” Robert Johnson (1937) – race music/classical blues • “Mannish Boy,” Muddy Waters (1955) – blues more into R&B ohyper-masculinism, stylistic features → call-and-response, away from older blues format, backing instruments (harmonica, drum set, guitar, shouts), single line guitar • “Mama, He Treats Your Daughter Mean,” Ruth Brown (1953) – R&B •“Johnny B. Goode,” Chuck Berry (1958) – r&b/rock

“Tutti Frutti,” Little Richard (1955); also Elvis and Pat Boone versions – r&b/rock, white artists to cover black hits •“Hound Dog,” Elvis Presley (also Big Mama Thornton)

Terms/concepts
Acoustic vs. electric guitar
oAcoustic – no electrical amplification, softer
oElectric – amplified, louder
Backbeats
oStrong accent on one of the normally unaccented beats of the bar, esp. in jazz & popular music •Blackface
oWhat minstrel performers would do before performance, paint face brown (both whites and blacks did this) •Blues
oMusical features
West African traditions
Flatted “blue notes”
Originally for AA, but everyone else liked it too
oLyrics → unemployment, crime, self-pity, sexuality and love → daily life oForm: rhymed 3 line verses, first 2 are similar & pose a question or problem, followed by contrasting answer/statement o12-bar blues

oBlue notes → “bent notes” or notes slightly flat of a normal note as played on a piano; played country blues era by either stopping the string with a bottleneck slide or bending the string on the fret •Bobby soxer

ois a 1940s sociologic phrase denoting the over zealous, usually teenage and young adult girls fans of Frank Sinatra •Bristol Sessions
o1927 – Bristol, TN sessions (hillbilly music), 500+ race records recorded each year •Call-and-response
oSuccession of two distinct phrases usually played by diff. musicians •Chess Records
o“Mannish boy”
oLeonard and Phil Chess (homegrown operation)
oFirst blues, R&B, and then later jazz, gospel, etc.
oRecorded many important blues artists (Muddy waters, howling wolf, little walter, sonny boy, etc) •Crooner
oBetter microphones/recordings could focus on voice
oTin Pan Alley with “sweet band” sounds (horns, winds, strings, back-up singers) oMusicals – stage & film
oSinger (typically male) who sings sentimental songs in soft, low voice •Delta blues
oMost important blues singers all born within 100 miles of each other in Mississippi delta oPost civil war south (Jim crow, sharecropping, development of guitar) oMove north
Acoustic delta blues
Struggles in city
Ed Sullivan show
oRan on CBS from 1948 to 1971, hosted by Ed Sullivan
“Five Elvises”—music, style, impact
o1. Sun records elvis (young, crazy, messy, exciting … “Good rockin tonight”) o2. RCA elvis (confident, mature, polished, strong baritone voice … Don’t be cruel”)
o3. Gospel elvis (nice, god-fearing, heartfelt… “Amazing grace”) o4. Hollywood elvis (embarrassing, bad songs/movies… “rock a hula”) o5. Las vegas elvis (bloated, pathetic, good music… “Fools rush in”) •Grand Ole Opry

oNashville, Tennessee
o...
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