Pareto Analysis

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MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTING & PERFORMANCE EVALUATION
MAF 635

PARETO ANALYSIS
GROUP 10
PREPARED FOR:
PN. ZARINAH ABDUL RASIT

CONTENT

| PAGE|
INTRODUCTION| 2|
WHAT IS PARETO ANALYSIS?| 2|
HISTORY OF PARETO ANALYSIS| 3|
WHEN TO USE PARETO ANALYSIS| 3|
HOW TO USE PARETO ANALYSIS| 4|
RISK AND WAYS TO AVOID IT| 7|
ADVANTAGES & DISADVANTAGES| 8|
CONCLUSION| 8|
APPENDIX| 9|

INTRODUCTION
In this chapter, we will discuss on Pareto Analysis topic which is a statistical techniques in decision making. We will focus on:
* The definition of Pareto Analysis.
* The history of Pareto Analysis.
* When we can use Pareto Analysis.
* How to use Pareto Analysis.
* The risks of using Pareto Analysis.
* Ways to avoid the risks arises.
* The advantages and disadvantages of Pareto Analysis.

WHAT IS PARETO ANALYSIS?
The definition of Pareto Analysis can be identified as statistical techniques in decision making. The difference between other decision making techniques is this analysis are applying the 80/20 rule. Which is by doing 20% of works, will gain 80% advantage of the entire works. Meaning here is by only focusing on significant issue or problems, we can gain a 80% returns as we focus on the entire works. This Pareto Analysis is a creative way of looking at causes of problems to help stimulate thinking and organize thought.

HISTORY OF PARETO ANALYSIS

WHEN TO USE PARETO ANALYSIS

* During problem analysis, to find those sub-problems that will return the greatest benefits. * Used in any general situation where you want to prioritise action. For example, use it when selecting potential solutions, by comparing their cost-benefit ratios. * Use it in a team situation to show results of voting.

HOW TO USE PARETO ANALYSIS
STEPS | DESCRIPTION | EXAMPLE |
Identify Items
to compare | * Identify the items to be analysed and charted. * These should be a single complete group that can be measured in the same way.| For example ‘Damaged seats’| Choose measurement

units| * Find a measurement unit this that will lead to the highest bar being the most important to address. * This is often a count of something. | A weighting factor may be used to ensure the highest number is the most important.| Plan the measurement| * Determine how many items must be measured to build a representative chart. * Plan the detail of the work, including who will measure what, how, for how long, and so on. | If possible aim for around 50 items, as this will give a statistically repeatable chart.If you repeat the measurement, keep all conditions as similar as possible. | Measure as planned| * Carry out the measurement as planned. * A Check Sheet can be used to manually record measurements.| | Plot the chart| * Plot the results in vertical bars, sorted with the highest bar on the left.| If there are a lot of items that would lead to a long tail of small bars, you can combine these into an ‘others’.| Select the focus| * Choose the number of bars which you will address further (this is usually one or two).| If there are a lot of items that would lead to a long tail of small bars, you can combine these into an ‘others’.| Take action| * Take the work to the next stage by acting on your findings.| If the bar selected is big, you can find a further focus by breaking this down into a sub-Pareto chart.|

EXAMPLE:

* The city hospital has to analyse and solve the various complaints of the patients, which are submitted to the Head Nurse Office. In order to analyse the complaints and claims we use the Pareto Diagram. * With consideration 845 received complaints, starting from the complaint forms filled in by the medical service beneficiaries, which were grouped in the following categories.

1) COMPLAINTS BY CATEGORY:

2) REARRANGE THE PROBLEMS ACCORDING TO...
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