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Experiment 2
DYNAMIC – NEWTON’S SECOND LAW

NUR SYUHAIDAH BT ZAIDI
CPM97/12C
GROUP D
16th APRIL 2013
MR.ZIKRI

GROUP’S MEMBER:
- WAN NUR'ATIQAH HANIS BT WAN SOLAH
- FATHIAH HANIM BT SHAKIRIN
- AZWINA BT JUAZER RIZAL
- FARAH ADIBAH BT MOHD JOHARI
-SITI THAHIRAH BT ABUL KALAM

Objective : a) To determine the relationship between velocity and time
b) To determine the acceleration of the motion of the trolley
c) To find the constant force exerted on the trolley

Introduction:
Newton's second law of motion pertains to the behavior of objects for which all existing forces are not balanced. The second law states that the acceleration of an object is dependent upon two variables - the net force acting upon the object and the mass of the object. The acceleration of an object depends directly upon the net force acting upon the object, and inversely upon the mass of the object. As the force acting upon an object is increased, the acceleration of the object is increased. As the mass of an object is increased, the acceleration of the object is decreased. Force is equal to mass times acceleration (for constant mass). So ,An object will accelerate in the direction of any net force applied to it. The greater the force, the greater the acceleration. The greater the mass, the slower the acceleration. This means that the rate an object is slowing down or speeding up (acceleration) depends on how hard it is hit, pushed, or pulled (force) and the mass of the object. This means that the rate an object is slowing down or speeding up (acceleration) depends on how hard it is hit, pushed, or pulled (force) and the mass of the object. Let’s take a look at some examples to learn more about Newton’s Second Law. A truck hits a car; the car moves forward. The truck provides the force, the car is the mass, and the acceleration is how quickly the car (mass) moves forward. The larger and heavier the car (mass) is, the more force it takes to move it. If the car is very light, it will move forward quicker than if the car is very heavy. If you throw a 10-lb. weight and a 2-lb. weight with the same amount of force, the 2 lb. weight will travel faster than the 10-lb. weight. That is because there is less mass to be moved. Although few people could quote Newton’s Second Law, everyone has used it before. It is part of everyday life; the heavier something is, the harder you have to push to move it. You don’t really spend a lot of time thinking about it because your brain knows it so well. For example, if you think a door is heavy, your brain will automatically tell you to apply a lot of force, but if the door is actually light you will end up slamming it.

Theory :

The equation of Newton’s motion for any mass m that move in the velocity respect to time will give force F onto it that given by

F = ma

where a = dvdt is an acceleration

or F = mdvdt

Acceleration a can be derived from the slope of the v – t graph as shown in the Figure 1 :

v

t dvdt = a

Figure 1

Apparatus :

i) Trolley without friction
ii) ‘Runway’ plane
iii) ‘Timer’
iv) meter ruler

Figure 2

Procedure:

a) Set up the apparatus as in the Figure 2.
b) Measure and record the mass of the trolley.
c) Start the experiment on top of the on runway.
d) Release the trolley. Start the timer simultaneously. e) Stop the timer when the car reaches the bottom of the track. f) Repeat steps c) – e) for 4 different lengths with...
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