Fitzgerald's Satire on the American Dream in the Great Gatsby

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The American Dream is dead. This is one of the main themes, if not the main theme in F. Scott Fitzgerald's novel The Great Gatsby. In the novel Fitzgerald gives us a glimpse into the life of the high class during the 1920’s through the eyes of the narrator, a moralistic young man named Nick Carraway. It is through his dealings with high society that readers are shown how modern values have transformed the American Dream's pure ideals into a scheme for materialistic power and self-betterment, how the new world of high society lacks any sense of morals or consequence. In order to support this message, Fitzgerald presents the original aspects of the American Dream along with its modern face to show that the once impervious dream is now lost forever to the American people. This world takes a look at the fact that the rich and powerful were able to get away with whatever they want and simple ideals were forgotten. As the average American in the 1920s became more captivated with wealth and everyday luxuries, some began satirizing the hypocrisy and greed they observed. Fitzgerald conveys these observations with the general hopelessness of the book. Gatsby is one who is most hopeful to the American Dream, he embodies the belief in it, but he soon finds out that the very wealth and recognition that he so coveted was what caused the destruction all his beliefs. F. Scott Fitzgerald credits the destruction of the American Dream to wealth, privilege, and the lack of humanity that those aspects create. Money is clearly identified as the main culprit in the dream's death. It becomes easily entangled with hope and success and replacing their positions in the American Dream with materialism. This is shown through Gatsby's use of illegal practices and underground connections to make money. His lavish parties, huge mansion, and giant collection of clothing all represent his corruption. His use of status and privilege is demonstrated when his traffic violation is ignored by the...
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