Driving to the Funeral

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“Driving to the Funeral”

When a teenager at the early age of 15-years-old eagerly wants to drive, they are more at risk of losing their lives than a 17-year-old. Adding alcohol to the mix and the numbers of deaths increases rapidly. More teenagers today are driving cars at this young age, without their parents having a clue what there are getting into; (Thesis) According to Quindlen’s article, “Driving to the Funeral” argues this vital point to its government; That car crashes are the “No. 1 cause of death among 15 to 20 year olds in the country.” Intensely agreeing with these vital points shared: raising the drinking age have saved thousands of lives, 17-year-old drives most likely have fewer accidents, and speeding-the-leading factor in teenage fatal crashes. Initially, no one can deny that raising the drinking age have saved thousands of lives. As a teen in earlier times and wanting to fit in, while asking my parents if they would buy me a car, my dad said, “Son you want a car, go work for it.” Being the ambitious type, started doing lawn service, and pushing newspapers helped to obtain a car within several weeks. Soon after, as we hung out with the older teens, drinking became one of our past times. At that time the drinking age was 18-years-old, we made sure at least one of us had age to buy alcohol. For example; Knowing then, as this article describes; “The drinking age was raised from 18-21. It’s becoming gospel that this has saved thousands of lives,” (Quindlen). Would this statement have helped us make better choices? Obvious not, this is still happening today. Furthermore, 17-year-old drives most likely have fewer accidents.

In conclusion, governments in many states has raised the drinking laws instead of chipping away at the right to drive, may have helped save more than thousands of lives. Therefore, in some states 16-year-old driver are getting into more accidents than 17-year-olds, and most common of all speeding...
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