Doctor Faustus: Tragic Hero

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According to Aristotle, the classical definition of a tragedy is a drama with a hero. Doctor Faustus is the protagonist and tragic hero of Marlowe’s play. He is considered a tragic hero because he brings his own downfall by the end of the play. Doctor Faustus is a contradictory character due to his high ambitions and then his blindness and willingness to waste his power. From the beginning of the story when Faustus is introduced, he tells the audience how he is usefully skilled in law, medicine and divinity and how he desires to learn more. From this instance his curiosity may be thought of as part of human nature, which is not wrong in society. However, having so much curiosity often blinds Faustus from what is right and wrong. This curiosity leads to Faustus making a deal with the devil, which is his tragic flaw. A tragic hero has to be doomed from the beginning of the play, but the character does not hold any responsibility for the flaw or fault. The audience in turns knows that from the very beginning that Doctor Faustus is potentially doomed. Doctor Faustus has a sense of realism about his character, and because of this it helps the audience relate this Faustus’s character even more. Faustus makes mistakes which is relatable to the human conditions and contributes to the overall realism of the play. The since of realism introduces pity to the play. Faustus is arrogant, but since his ambitions are so big, we cannot help but feel impressed and feel sympathy for Faustus. Since there is pity for Faustus it suggests that there was a connection between the audience and Doctor Faustus. Overall Faustus connects to his audience because of his since of realism and how he relates to human attributes.
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