Applied Game Theory

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  • Topic: Game theory, Nash equilibrium, Subgame perfect equilibrium
  • Pages : 17 (2229 words )
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  • Published : February 23, 2013
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Applied Game Theory
Christophe Crombez

Crombez: Applied Game Theory.

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Applied Game Theory
Introduction

Crombez: Applied Game Theory.

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What is Game Theory?
• a way of analyzing strategic interactions • appropriate to study situations in which several people take decisions, and o their decisions affect each other’s payoffs • equivalent of decision theory o

Crombez: Applied Game Theory.

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Course Objectives
• introduce you to game theory
to understand papers that use it, and o develop game-theoretical models yourselves • the focus is on solution concepts o theory o exercises o a few applications o

Crombez: Applied Game Theory.

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Contents
• Basic equilibrium concepts
Nash equilibria o Subgame perfection o Sequential equilibria • Applications o Bargaining o Entry deterrence o Repeated games o

Crombez: Applied Game Theory.

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Practicalities
• Five meetings • Text Book: Kreps, A Course in Microeconomic Theory, Chapters 11-15 • Slides on Toledo • Homeworks • Exam: in January, written, open book, exercises

Crombez: Applied Game Theory.

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Applied Game Theory
Modeling Competitive Situations

Crombez: Doctoral Seminar.

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Outline
• • • • •
Decision Trees Game Trees (Extensive Forms) Formalities Normal Forms (Strategic Forms) Mixed Strategies

Kreps: Chapter 11

Crombez: Doctoral Seminar.

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Decision Trees
• • • •
Choice/decision nodes Chance nodes Branches A chance node precedes a choice node iff the uncertainty represented by that chance node resolves in the mind of the decision maker prior to the time at which the choice must be made.

Crombez: Doctoral Seminar.

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Game Trees
• • • •
Nature Payoffs Information Sets If someone learns something (a move by nature or by another player) prior to making a decision, the node representing what is learned must precede the node where the decision is taken.

Crombez: Doctoral Seminar.

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Formalities
• An extensive form representation of a noncooperative
game consists of o a list of players o a game tree o an assignment of decision nodes to players or nature o lists of actions available at each decision node o a correspondence between immediate successors of each decision node and available actions

Crombez: Doctoral Seminar.

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information sets o an assignment of payoffs for each players to terminal nodes o probability assessments over the initial nodes and over the actions at any node that is assigned to nature • Each node other than the initial nodes has one immediate predecessor. o

Crombez: Doctoral Seminar.

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• Information Sets
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each node belongs to one information set a player remembers at any point whether he moved previously any two nodes in an information set have the same player moving a player is faced with the same available actions at any two nodes in an information set

Crombez: Doctoral Seminar.

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• Simultaneous Moves • Precedence and Information Sets • Perfect Recall o o

a player may not forget what he did earlier a player may not forget what he knew earlier

Crombez: Doctoral Seminar.

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Normal Forms
• Strategies
specify which actions players take in every information set assigned to them • Strategy Profiles combinations of strategies for the various players • Reduced Normal Forms elimination of equivalent strategies

Crombez: Doctoral Seminar.

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Mixed Strategies
• Mixed Strategies are probability distributions over pure strategies. • Behaviorally Mixed Strategies mix-as-you-go

Crombez: Doctoral Seminar.

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Applied Game Theory
Solution Concepts for Noncooperative Games

Crombez: Doctoral Seminar.

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Outline
• • • • • • • •
Dominance Solvable Games Backwards Induction Nash Equilibrium Equilibria in Mixed Strategies Obvious Ways to Play Games Subgame Perfection Sequential Equilibrium More Refinements Kreps: Chapter 12

Crombez: Doctoral Seminar.

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Dominance Solvable...
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