A Nation Aborted

Topics: Philippines, Philippine Revolution, Colonialism Pages: 29 (10257 words) Published: February 16, 2010
UCLA Center for Southeast Asian Studies UC Los Angeles

Title: Philippine Historiography and Colonial Discourse: Eight Selected Essays on Postcolonial Studies in the Philippines (An Introduction to the Japanese Translation) by Yoshiko Nagano (translated into English by Michiyo Yoneno-Reyes) Author: Yoneno-Reyes, Michiyo Publication Date: 06-07-2007 Series: Occasional Papers Publication Info: Occasional Papers, UCLA Center for Southeast Asian Studies, UCLA International Institute, UC Los Angeles Permalink: http://escholarship.org/uc/item/8zt322fw Citation: Yoneno-Reyes, Michiyo. (2007). Philippine Historiography and Colonial Discourse: Eight Selected Essays on Postcolonial Studies in the Philippines (An Introduction to the Japanese Translation) by Yoshiko Nagano (translated into English by Michiyo Yoneno-Reyes). UC Los Angeles: UCLA Center for Southeast Asian Studies. Retrieved from: http://escholarship.org/uc/item/8zt322fw Additional Info: Read in connection with Yoshiko Nagano (July 19, 2006) Transcultural Battlefield: Recent Japanese Translations of Philippine History. Keywords: Philippines postcolonial, Reynaldo Ileto, Vicente Rafael, Floro Quibuyen Abstract: This essay was originally written by Yoshiko Nagano in 2004 in Japanese as a commentary to an edited volume where Japanese translation of eight essays by three Filipino historians, Reynaldo C. Ileto, Vicente L. Rafael and Floro C. Quibuyen - originally written in English – are compiled. Originally the essay was written for Japanese readers, then translated into English by Michiyo Yoneno-Reyes. The essay analyzes the contributions of the three Filipino authors to Philippine historiography, to post-colonial studies broadly, and to post-colonial studies in Japan in particular.

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Philippine Historiography and Colonial Discourse: Eight Selected Essays on Postcolonial Studies in the Philippines (An Introduction to the Japanese Translation)

Yoshiko Nagano (translated by Michiyo Yoneno-Reyes)

from Reynaldo C. Ileto, Vicente L. Rafael and Floro C. Quibuyen, Translation texts compiled and edited by Yoshiko Nagano, Firipin Rekishikenkyu to Shokuminchi Gensetsu [Philippine Historiography and Colonial Discourse], Published by Mekong Publishing Co., Tokyo, 2004, 389pp. (p.357-p.385)

[Introduction by Translator] This essay was originally written by Yoshiko Nagano in 2004 in Japanese as a commentary to a book where Japanese translation of eight essays by three Filipino historians, Reynaldo C. Ileto, Vicente L. Rafael and Floro C. Quibuyen - originally written in English – are compiled. I consider it significant to publish the English translation of the commentary for wider readership for the following two reasons. First, this essay serves as a handy yet reliable introduction to the current discourse and debates in Philippine historiography, particularly those of the American colonial period in the framework of a postcolonial critique. The insightful observations of the author, who has been vigorously engaged in Philippine studies for the past quartercentury, sheds light on the question of the “United States’ politico-cultural power,” both explicit and implicit, throughout the colonial and postcolonial Philippines. I believe that the three distinguished Filipino historians, as shown in this essay, suggest a provocative approach towards postcolonial discourse, as well as towards globalization. This is very

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useful. Furthermore, I consider that reconstruction of the history of the American period in the Philippines, as summarized in this essay, also contributes to another trend in Philippine studies, by providing critical reflections on the Marcos regime outside the narrow field of political science.i Particularly the discussion of idiosyncratic nationalism by the dictator vis-à-vis the legacy of...

Cited: [English sources] Agoncillo, Teodoro, A. 1956 (1st ed) / 1996 (reprint). The Revolt of the Masses: The Story of Bonifacio and the Katipunan, Quezon City: University of the Philippines. Azurin, Arnold M., 2002. “Orientalism? Priviledge Vistas Most Probably,” Philippine Political Science Journal, vol. 23, no. 46. Cannell, Fenella, 1999. Power and Intimacy in the Christian Philippines. Quezon City: Ateneo de Manila University Press. Carr, E. H., 1961[2001]. What is History?, Houndmills, UK: Palgrave. Constantino, Renato, 1969. “Veneration without Understanding,” Third National Rizal Lecture, 30 December 1969; In Dissent and Counter Consciousness, Manila: Erewhon, 1970 Filipinos in History, 1989, 1990, 1992, 1994. 4 vols., Manila: National Historical Institute.
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Holt, Elizabeth Mary, 2002. Colonizing Filipinas: Nineteenth-Century Representations of the Philippines in Western Historiography, Quezon City: Ateneo de Manila University Press. Ileto, Reynaldo C., 1979 [1st print.] / 1989 [3rd print]. Pasyon and Revolution: Popular Movements in the Philippines, 1840-1910, Quezon City: Ateneo de Manila University Press. ________, 1998. Filipinos and Their Revolution: Event, Discourse, and Historiograohy, Quezon City: Ateneo de Manila University Press. ________, 1999. Knowing America’s Colony: A Hundred Years from the Philippine War, Philippine Studies Occasional Paper Series no. 13, Center for Philippine Studies, University of Hawai’i at Manoa. ________, 2001. “Colonial Wars in Southern Luzon: Remembering and Forgetting,” Hitotsubashi Journal of Social Studies no. 33. ________, 2002. “On Sidel’s Response and Bossism in the Philippines,” Philippine Political Science Journal, vol. 23, no. 46. ________, forthcoming. Knowledge and Pacification: Essays in the U.S. Conquest and the Writing of Philippine History. Quezon City: Ateneo de Manila University Press. Lande, Carl H., 2002. “Political Clientalism, Developmentalism and Postcolonial Theory: A Reply to Ileto,” Philippine Political Science Journal, vol. 23, no. 46. Loomba, Ania, 1998. Colonialism/Postcolonialism, London and New York: Routledge May, Glenn Anthony, 1997. Inventing a Hero: The Posthumous Re-Creation of Andres Bonifacio, Quezon City: New Days Publishers. Mendoza, S. Lily, 2002. Between the Homeland and the Diaspora: The Politics of Theorizing Filipino and Filipino American Identities: A Second Look at the Poststructuralism-Indigenization Debates, New York and London: Routledge. Nagano, Yoshiko, 2004. “Collective Memory in a Globalized Society’: The Debate on the Philippine Revolution Reconsidered,” What is to be Written?: Setting the Agendas for Study of History: Workshop Proceedings, Institute for International Studies, Meiji Gakuin University. Quibuyen, Floro C., 1999. A Nation Aborted: Rizal, American Hegemony, and the Philippine Nationalism, Quezon City: Ateneo de Manila University Press. ________, 2002 “Rizal and Filipino Nationalism: Critical Issue,” Philippine Studies, vol. 50, no. 2. Rafael, Vicente L., 1988. Contracting Colonialism: Translation and Christian Conversion in Tagalog Society under Early Spanish Rule, Ithaca: Cornell University Press. ________, ed., 1995. Discrepant Histories: Translocal Essays in Filipino Cultures, Philadelphia: Temple University Press. ________, ed., 1999. Figures of Criminality in Indonesia, the Philippines and Colonial Vietnam, Ithaca: Southeast Asian Program Publications, Cornell University. ________, 2002. White Love and Other Events in Filipino History, Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press. ________, 2005. The Promise of the Foreign: Nationalism and the Technics of Translation in the Spanish Philippines, Durham, N. C.: Duke University Press. Said, Edward W., 1994. Representations of the Intellectual: The 1993 Reith Lectures, New York: Vintage Books.
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San Juan, E., 2000. After Postcolonialism: Remapping Philippines-United States Confrontations, Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc. Schumacher, John N., S. J., 2000. “Rizal and Filipino Nationalism: A New Approach,” Philippine Studies, vol. 48, no. 4. ________, 2002. “Reply of John N. Schumacher to Floro Quibuyen’s Response to the Review of His A Nation Aborted,” Philippine Studies, vol. 50 no. 3. Sidel, John T., 2002. “Response to Ileto: Or Why I Am Not an Orientalist,” Philippine Political Science Journal, vol. 23, no. 46. Vergara, Benito M. Jr., 1995. Displaying Filipinos: Photography and Colonialism in Early 20th Century Philippines, Quezon City: University of the Philippines Press. [Japanese sources] Guha, R, G. Pandey, P. Chatterjee, G. Spivak, Chiharu Takenaka trans., 1998. Sabarutan no Rekishi: Indoshi no Datsukochiku [History of Subaltern: The Deconstruction of Indian History], Tokyo: Iwanami Shoten. Ikehata, Setsuho. 1987. Firipin Kakumei to Katorisizumu [Philippine Revolution and Catholicism], Tokyo: Keiso Shobo. ________, 2001. “Ileto, Reynaldo C.,” Isamu Ogata, Koichi Kabayama and Yoichi Kibata eds., 20-seiki no Rekishikatachi (4) Sekai-hen 2 [The Historians in the 20th Century Vol. 4: Part II of the World], Tokyo: Tosui Shobo. Ileto, Reynaldo C., Fumiko Uchiyama trans., 2002. “Minami Luson niokeru Shokuminchi Senso: Hibei Senso no Kioku to Bokyaku [Colonial War in Southern Luzon: Remembering and Forgetting of the Philippine-American War],” In Hitsotsubashi Daigaku Shinpojiumu: 20-Seiki no Yume to Genjitsu; Senso, Bunmei, Fukusi [Hitotsubashi University International Symposium: Dream and Reality of the 20th Century; War, Civilization and Social Welfare], eds. By Tetsuro Kato and Masao Watanabe, Tokyo: Sairyusha. ________, Hiromu Shimizu, Yoshiko Nagano co-edit., Makito Kuwada, Satoshi Miyawaki and Kunio Takano co-trans. 2005. Kirisuto Junanshi to Kakumei: 184019190-nen no Firipin Minshu Undo [Pasyon and Revolution: Popular Movements in the Philippines, 1840-19190], Tokyo: Hosei University Press. Ishii, Yoneno, Koichi Takaya, Narifumi Maeda, Kenji Tshuchiya, and Setsuho Ikehata eds., 1986. Tonan-Ajia o Shiru Jiten [Cyclopedia of South-East Asia], Tokyo: Heibon-sha. ________, ed., Shizuo Suzuki and Shinzo Hayase comp. 1992. Firipin no Jiten [Cyclopedia of the Philippines], Kyoto: Dohosha. Nagano, Yoshiko, 2000. Rekishi to Eiyu: Firipin Kakumei Hyakunen to Posutokoroniaru [History and Heroes: The Centennial of the Philippine Revolution and Postcolonial], Kanagawa Daigaku Hyoron Bukkuretto Shirizu [Kanagawa University Review Booklet Series] no. 11. Tokyo: Ochanomizu Shobo. ________, 2001a. “Amerika Shokuminchi Kokka to Firipin Kokumin no Sozo: 1903-nen Sensasu ni Miru [American Colonial State and the Formation of Filipinos: A View from the 1903 Census]”, Shokei Ronso [Review of Commerce and Economics] (Kanagawa University), vol. 36, no. 3. ________, 2001b. “Kioku kara Posutokoroniaru e: Chi no Shokuminshi Jokyo o Koerutameni [From Memories to Postcolonial: To Go beyond the Colonial State in
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Our Knowledge],” Kanagawa Daigaku Hyoron [Kanagawa University Review], vol. 39. ________, 2002a. “ Gurobaru Shihonshugi to Rekishi-ninshiki: HanGurobarizumu Shicho toshiteno Posutokoroniaru Hihyo; Firipin no Jirei [Plenary Session. Global Capitalism and Historical Consciousness: Postcolonial Critique as the Way of Thinking on the Counter-Globalizm: A Case of the Philippines], Rekishigaku Kenkyu [Journal of Historical Studies], vol. 768. ________, 2002b. “Firipin no Chishikijin to Posutokoroniaru Kenkyu [Filipino Intellectuals and Postcolonial Studies,” In Posutokoroniaru to Hi-Seio Sekai [Postcolonial and the non-Western World], ed. by Kanagawa Daigaku Hyoron Henshu Senmon Iinkai [Editorial Board of the Kanagawa University Review Book Series], no. 10, Tokyo: Ochanomizu Shobo. ________, 2003. “Firipin Kakumeishi Ronso [The Debate on the Philippine Revolution]”, In Iwanami Koza: Tonan Ajiashi: Bekkan; Tonan Ajiashi Kenkyu Annai [Iwanami Lectures: Southeast Asian History Supplementary Volume: A Guide to the Study of Southeast Asian History], eds. By Shinzo Hayase and Shiro Momoki, Tokyo: Iwanami Shoten. Sakai, Naoaki. 1997. Nihon Shiso toiu Mondai: Honyaku to Shutai [Question on Japanese Thoughts: Translation and the Subject]. Tokyo: Iwanamia Shoten. Ueno, Toshiya and Yoshitaka Moori, 2000. Karuchuraru Sutadizu Nyumon [An Introduction to Cultural Studies], Tokyo: Chikuma Shobo. (Written in June, 2004)
[Translator’s notes] For instance, Gerard A. Finin’s The Making of the Igorot: Contours of Cordillera Consciousness (Ateneo de Manila University Press, 2005) illustrates the continuity of the mental framework of the Filipinos at large on the concept of the “Cordillera” since the American period that was reinforced during the Marcos period by both administration and anti-Marcos advocates. ii For instance, in his lecture “Pantayong Pananaw Revisited”, Arnold Azurin severely criticized the pantayong pananaw discourse from a postcolonial perspective (August 2004, University of the Philippines). The lecture evoked discussion from the floor on its academic engagement with the dictatorship. In his lecture “Ugnayan: Music and Social Move in Composition”, Ramon P. Santos revealed the details of the political background that facilitated the composition and performance of Ugnayan by late national artist José Maceda, who remained apolitical himself, in January 1974 (January 31, 2007, University of the Philippines). Ugnayan is an avant-garde work that could not have been produced without the extraordinary social condition of martial-law, as the piece requires the extensive cooperation/ participation of radio stations and a mass audience. iii Edward W. Said, Representation of the Intellectual (Vintage Books, 1994[1996]); p.60. iv The phrase after “reflecting” is an addition by the author for this English translation version. v This sentence is an addition by the author to this English translation version. vi The phrase after “by” is an addition by the author for this English translation version. vii He served for the position until 2006. viii The word “early” in this sentence is an insertion for this English translation version. ix The phrase after “to reveal” is an insertion by the author for this translation version. x Published in 2005. xi “Minzoku shugisha” is literally “ethnicity-ist”, or an advocate of a certain ethnicity, while “kokumin shugisha” is “people of the nation-ist”, or an advocate of a particular nation-state and its people. “Nasyonarisuto” in Japanese often carries the nuance of right-wing nationalist, in association with the era of Fascism in their collective memory.
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