Wozny HurricaneKatrinav3

Topics: Hurricane Katrina, Federal Emergency Management Agency, Leadership / Pages: 8 (2825 words) / Published: May 31st, 2015
Hurricane Katrina; the Polarity of Leadership
Timothy C. Wozny
Trine University

Table Of Contents
Abstract 3
Michael Brown…………………………………………………………………………………….4
Admiral Thad Allen……………………………………………………………………………….6
Governor Kathleen Blanco………………………………………………………………………..8
Conclusion…………………………………………………………………………………….…10
References………………………………………………………………………………………..12

Abstract Hurricane Katrina remains one of the most prominent natural disasters to afflict the United States in decades. Its damage is estimated to be over $81 billion dollars leaving over 1,800 people dead and left millions stranded without homes (Zhang, 2011). While disasters like this are naturally occurring the truth is that much could have been done to better protect those who suffered at the hands of it. Many key leaders were directly involved in the heroics and the underachievement that made up the planning process of this Category five hurricane. Many were hailed as heroes using their innate leadership to make pivotal decisions while others failed under the weight of their own inability and thick bureaucratic roadblocks.

Hurricane Katrina; the Polarity of Leadership Erskine Bowles once stated that leadership is the key to 99 percent of all successful efforts. When Hurricane Katrina struck land in New Orleans in 2005 no one could have imagined the destruction it would leave in its path. Entire areas of New Orleans were eradicated and the death toll reached to over 1800 (Hurricane Katrina: The Roles of the U.S. Departement of HLS and FEMA Leadership, 2006). The reaction to such devastation by those who were the face of leadership was polarizing. In the face of adversity, key leaders chose to frame their planning efforts in multiple ways. Some would come to regret the decisions they made, others were marked as heroes.
Michael Brown
One of the elemental leaders involved in Hurricane Katrina was the once head of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Michael Brown. Brown took



References: Berinato, S. (2010, November). The Magazine. Retrieved from Harvard Business Review: http://hbr.org/2010/11/you-have-to-lead-from-everywhere/ar/1 Bolman, L Brinkley, D. (2006, June). How New Orleans Drowned. Retrieved from Vanity Fair: http://www.vanityfair.com/politics/features/2006/06/brinkley_excerpt200606 CNN.com Democrats, L. (2005, Sept 14). Governor Kathleen Blanco: Strong Leadership in the Midst of Catastrophe. Retrieved from Lafayette Demorcrats: http://www.lafayettedemocrats.org/forms/20050914_blanco.pdf (2005) (2006). Hurricane Katrina: The Roles of the U.S. Departement of HLS and FEMA Leadership. Washington D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office . Marek, A. C. (2006, October 22). Money & Business. Retrieved from Always Ready for the Storm: http://www.usnews.com/usnews/news/articles/061022/30allen_2.htm Sobel, R Wilmouth, B. (2005, October 8). NBC 's Lisa Myers Reports on Governor Blanco 's Katrina. Retrieved from NewsBusters: http://newsbusters.org/node/2072 Zhang, B

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