Trial By Jury

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Jury
• A group of citizens sworn to hear testimony and evidence at a trial and decide if the defendant is guilty or not of committing the crime(s)
Trial by Jury
• The fate of the accused is determined by peers
How is a jury selected?
• Through a process called empanelling:
A list of jurors is created from a list of people living in the area where the court is located
1. 75-100 names from the list are randomly picked
2. These people are summoned to appear in court by notice from the sheriff (failure to appear could result in being criminally charged)
3. Start of trial-perspective jurors assemble in courtroom
4. Each prerspective juror steps forward once name is read
5. Defense and crown prosecutor can accept or reject the jurors
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• Judge may exempt anyone with a personal interest/relationship in the case
• The jurors must decide to acquit or convict the accused beyond a reasonable doubt (that is accused is guilty according to common sense as applied to the criterion/law)
• Deliberations means: To discuss the aspects of a trial by carefully considering and reflection on the trial by carefully considering and reflection on the facts given; this can be done by a judge or jury.
• A jury Foreperson is the man or women who’s peaks on behalf of the jury and tries to maintain order during deliberations; usually elected by the jury members.
• A jury’s decisions must be unanimous. All members of the jury must become one mind in their decision.
• A jury may become sequestered in the event that the court/judge feels that they are being unduly influenced by environmental factors outside of the courtroom.
A Jury’s Verdict 1. Hung Jury: Jury cannot agree, a new trial must take
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Second degree murder: killing of another person, but its not on purpose and not premeditated. The person intends to kill someone in the heat of the moment.
Manslaughter: Homicide, or the killing of another person by committing an unlawful act and with only general intent.
ACTIONS THAT MUST EXIST FOR AN ACT TO BE A CRIME 1. The act is considered wrong by society 2. The act causes harm to society in general 3. The harm must be serious 4. The remedy must be handled by the criminal justice system

TYPES OF CRIMINAL OFFENCES 1. Summary conviction offences 2. Indictable offences 3. Hybrid offences
Infanticide: the killing of an infant shortly after birth
Motive: the reasons why a person commits a crime
Intent: what a person means to

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