Thomas Paine

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October 8, 2014
Thomas Paine
Who was Thomas Paine?
Thomas Paine is a British, American born on January 29, 1737. He was born in Thetford, England. He was a political activist, philosopher, and revolutionist. Throughout his early lifespan, he had different jobs but he wasn’t known until he became a journalist. In 1774, he moved to America and during his time in Philadelphia, he became a journalist. He then published “Common Sense” in 1776 which remains one of the most important documents written during the time of American Revolution. In this document, Paine pointed out that Americans had the right to be independent and have their own government. He made it clear enough so everyone can understand and made a powerful impact which motivated many Americans. He then later wrote “The American Crisis” and when he moved to France, he wrote the “Rights of Man” which was involved with the French Revolution.
In 1793, he was imprisoned in Paris for not favoring the execution of Louis XVI. During his time in jail, he began to write the first part of “The Age of Reason” and when he was bailed out of jail, he stayed in France continuing on to the second part of “The Age of Reason.” Here, he defends deism and deeply writes about anti-Christianity and the mind of free thoughts
What does the primary source say?
He wrote this pamphlet so that many people can realize they have the right to be free mentally, physically, and spiritually. The pamphlet was written specifically to show his disagreement with Christianity. Here, he speaks of the corrupted churches and believes they have too much political power. He argues that the bible is full of mythology and is therefore not written by God himself. He goes against the revelation. He doubts on the miracles of the resurrection and the birth of Virgin Mary. He points out how one can raise himself from the death and how Virgin Mary can get pregnant overnight without any sexual contact. He calls them fraud and false miracles. He

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