Thermodynamic Variables of KNO3

Powerful Essays
Topics: Thermodynamics
Experiment 3:
Solution Calorimetry: Thermodynamics of Potassium Nitrate

II. Abstract A determination of thermodynamic variables of KNO3 is presented. KNO3 was heated and dissolved in varying volumes of distilled water. Upon dissolution, the KNO3 solution was removed from heat and the temperature was recorded once crystals formed. For each solution, ∆G the Ksp were found with the temperature and molarity values. ∆H and ∆S were found through the linearization of the data with a plot of lm(Ksp) vs. . ∆G becomes increasingly negative as temperature and concentration increased. ∆H was found to be 29.46 kJmol-1 with a 15.7% error compared to literature values. ∆S was found to be .120kJmol-1K-1 with a 3.81% error compared to the literature value.

III. Introduction Potassium Nitrate is a molecule of many applications. Potassium Nitrate is applied in explosives, production of glass, and in solar power plants. There are many industrial applications in explosives, the production of glass and has recently been applicable in solar power plants. Potassium Nitrate is able to assist in one of the largest problems with solar power, which is the storage of solar power once it is collected. The solar power industry has long been concentrated on developing photovoltaic cells, but recently plants call Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) plant have found new methods involving KNO3 for energy1. With KNO3 as such a promising source of energy, its thermodynamics whilst in solution are of interest. The thermodynamic properties of the molecule need to be understood so that its uses for creating green energy can be improved upon. Beyond energy for buildings, potassium nitrate can also have a hand in the energy in the human body. When consuming food, there is hope that the food is free of chlorine and other unwanted metals; thanks to potassium nitrate, that is a real option. Potassium and nitrogen are elements essential to the life cycle of the

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