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The Effects of Cultural Assimilation: Conformity vs. Unorthodoxdy

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The Effects of Cultural Assimilation: Conformity vs. Unorthodoxdy
The Effects of Cultural Assimilation: Conformity vs. Unorthodoxdy “Cultural assimilation is a complex and multifaceted process that first involves immigrants learning the language, cultural norms, and role expectations of the absorbing society, and further changes in attitudes”, or so it is explained by Dejun Su, Chad Richardson, and Guang-zhen Wang, in their article, “Assessing Cultural Assimilation of Mexican Americans: How Rapidly Do Their Gender-Role Attitudes Converge to the U.S. Mainstream?” (764). Throughout history and also present day society, cultural assimilation is easy to be identified, thanks to the “melting pot” quality of North America. Also, cultural assimilation is questioned about the effects it has on various groups of immigrants. Effects, such as the loss of one's identity, the struggle to attain success in the new country, the loss of one's heritage and unique background, conflict between family and friends and stereotypical discrimination in society, are demonstrated in varying degrees by the past and present generations of immigrants from the countries of Mexico, Japan and the Middle East. Throughout history, Mexican immigrants have continuously crossed the boarder into America for the chance of a new life. However, coming to a new country inevitably has it's consequences, and the pressures of assimilation are always present. During a time of great immigration of European citizens into the United States, Mexican immigrants were not so much of a concern throughout the whole country. Katherine Benton-Cohen supports this idea in her article “Other Immigrants: Mexicans and the Dillingham Commission of 1907-1911”, by explaining that, “Unlike Japanese immigration in California—which had set international diplomatic maneuvers in motion, in this period 'American officials generally viewed Mexican immigration as a local labor issue,' not a national or international policy question” (39). As a result, the Mexican immigrants were not so quick as

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