The Effect of the Spread of AIDS on African Society

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HOW HAS THE SPREAD OF AIDS AFFECTED AFRICAN SOCIETY
1. Baer, Hans., et al. "Medical Anthropology and the World System." A Critical Perspective Ch. 8: p159-269.
2. Stine, Gerald J. "Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome…

The facts written are by Gerald J. Stine in "Acquired Immune Deficiency syndrome" . Worldwide, about 9,000 persons a day become HIV-infected. The majority of all HIV infections worldwide occur in people ages 15-24. Over 1 million people die of AIDS each year. The number of HIV-infections worldwide has tripled since 1990! It is estimated that there will be a 20% drop in population in East Africa by the year 2001 because of AIDS (Stine, 360). "AIDS is the leading cause of deaths among adult men and the second leading cause of deaths among adult women in Africa" (Bethel, 13). "It is extremely difficult to judge the exact extent of AIDS in Africa, either geographically or in the population" so rather than just focusing on Western Africa , we should look at the bigger picture (Bethel, 138). Also, "we can assert that AIDS cases do not occur on the African continent in a uniform fashion but rather form an "AIDS Belt" in central, southern, and eastern Africa" (Bethel, 138).
First, Let me tell you that Third World Nations makeup three fourths of the Earth's population, and combining that fact with the fact that these worlds are not as advanced and have an lesser knowledge of prevention, and AIDS , it is not very surprising that these countries populations are impacted by death. "Africa, with about 12% of the world's population, is now reporting around 25% of the world's AIDS cases. It is estimated to have over 65% of the total number of HIV-infected adults and 90% of the world's HIV-infected children" (Stine, 364). An incredible and unbelievable fact that shows the impact of the disease in Africa is that 6,000 Africans are HIV-infected each day which is 250 persons per hour or four per minute. Between 20% and 30% of sexually

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