Supertition in Elizabethan Period

Powerful Essays
Superstition in Elizabethan Period

Superstition is a strange belief to the supernatural and against the reason. In the Elizabethan period in England, there were some superstition in which they though. Superstition came from the fear and the ignorance mixed with sometimes some casualty. According to Joseph Hall, superstition was mainly for warning. It was describe as superstition but it was a variety of what happens to them, and they thought it was a sin by God. Although he condemn superstition, because for him it was a way of misjudged God. Although for many people it was a way of living. Needless to say, that these supernatural ideas came from many times before. And that that believes were not something of the lower classes. Monarchy and Nobility also had supernatural belief.

Many superstitions are still with us, we are not so much different. But, when was the origin of those believes? From the Romans and from theirs Gods. From some costumes, from the Middle Ages. From the Celtics, the Vikings, the Anglo-Saxon. From each people which had invaded England and had spent many time giving their costumes, their languages and their believes to the supernatural and the magic. From the Celtic they took the idea of the powerful names, and also, Celtic women were thought to use plants as medicine. Because the idea of make "magic potions" and the relation between women and witches. And these ideas of being able to see the future with the plant 's power, it is still believed by some people at present. Every superstition about colors or about some kind of metals were taken from the Romans. Saxons believe in bad luck from animals such as those about cats, which I am going to explain later. From the Vikings is the idea of 13 being the number of bad luck. They though that number 12 was the number of the good luck, for that reason the idea of count in dozens. Besides the superstition there are some Christian costumes what are taken from costumes of Celtics, Romans, etc.



Bibliography: Robert Burton, The Anatomy of Melancholy (1621), "Six Kinds of Spirits". Samuel Harsnet, A Declaration of Egregious Popish Impostures (1603), "The Making of Frights and Witches". Alexander Roberts, A Treatise of Witchcraft (1616), "Why So Many Witches are Women". An Act Against Conjurations, Inchantments and Witchcrafts (1563). Reginald Scott, The Discovery of Witchcraft (1584) [excerpts]. Daemonologia: A Discourse on Witchcraft (1621), "Witches in West Yorkshire, c. 1620". Anon., Witches Apprehended, Examined, and Executed (1613), "Testing for a Witch".

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Good Essays

    Attitudes towards conflict in the Elizabethan Period Duelling in the Elizabethan era had to been done in private and even taken out of the country because it was illegal. As a consequence, those caught duelling would have to be hung. The Elizabethan Period was the age of the Renaissance. During the early Renaissance, duelling established the status of a respectable gentleman, and was an accepted manner to resolve disputes. Duelling in such societies was seen as an alternative to less regulated conflict…

    • 339 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Pre-IB 23 May 2011 Elizabethan Life/Elizabethan Dance Dance was an integral part of the lifestyle in the Elizabethan Era. Not only did the noble class enjoy it, but also the lower class. Dance was used in celebrations and parties, and often, just for leisure. Prestigious dancing masters taught these dances. These dances included unique forms and one-of-a-kind styles (Hall 81). First of all, dancing masters were great services for the English Elizabethan Court. In the Elizabethan era, it was required…

    • 1015 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Elizabethan Era

    • 972 Words
    • 4 Pages

    The Elizabethan Era The Elizabethan Era is named after one of the greatest Queens of England - Queen Elizabeth. It was known as the Renaissance age. The Elizabethan era was an important and one of the most fascinating periods. In the history of England many developments, inventions and new ideas were introduced during the Elizabethan era. The Elizabethan Era is not only famous for the Virgin Queen but also for the era itself - Great Explorers, such as Sir Francis Drake and Walter Raleigh…

    • 972 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    During the Elizabethan period, a ghost was seen as a common feature in most tragedy plays. Shakespeare's Hamlet is a prime example of the use of a 'ghost' to entice fear and apprehension amongst the Elizabethan audience. The ghost can be seen as projecting several functions throughout the play, all of which are vital to the play's ultimate impact. An Elizabethan audience were highly superstitious, held Roman Catholic beliefs of purgatory and were extremely fearful of afterlife and the uncertainty…

    • 317 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Elizabethan Theatre

    • 702 Words
    • 3 Pages

    The Elizabethan Theatre At the start, the plays were performed in the courtyard of Inns (Inn-yards). Which were very similar to the Greek and Roman amphitheatres. The plays were performed outdoors. Theatre was one of the most profitable businesses of that time, similar to what the cinema has been during the 20th century, for this reason several playhouses were built. In some other cases, the plays were also performed in temporary stages. Playhouses were also used for gambling. Theatres were…

    • 702 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Theatre of Elizabethan

    • 574 Words
    • 3 Pages

    THEATRE OF ELIZABETHAN: There were three different types of venues for Elizabethan plays: Inn yards, Playhouses and Open Air Amphitheatres a. Inn- yards: The Elizabethan Theatres started in the cobbled courtyards of Inns – they were called Inn-yards. As many as 500 people would attend play performances. Elizabethan acting troupes travelled the country and sought lodgings at inns or taverns and before long entrepreneurs, like James Burbage, started to produce plays at inn-yards – a popular…

    • 574 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Elizabethan Women

    • 596 Words
    • 3 Pages

    treated in the Elizabethan Era. John Madden, the producer, shows the women as inferior to men due to their emotions and weaknesses. These women are not allowed jobs other than bearing children or being housewives. John Madden also shows women as a bond to tie two families together as one. They are forced into premeditated marriages with men they do not love. The social standards for most women of high nobility were to wear large corseted dresses and apply pallid makeup (History of Elizabethan Women). These…

    • 596 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Elizabethan Poetry

    • 941 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Elizabethan Poetry I Drama dominates our syllabus but the Renaissance was a Golden Age not just for English drama, but also for English poetry. But what was English poetry? George Puttenham’s The Arte of English Poesie (1589) and Sir Philip Sidney’s The Defense of Poesie (1595): early attempts to think about English poetry as a distinct national tradition. Puttenham and Sidney were concerned to build a canon and help shape English poetry into a tradition capable of rivalling more prestigious…

    • 941 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Elizabethan Clothing

    • 453 Words
    • 2 Pages

    The most alien concepts of the Elizabethan era was that, regardless of their wealth, Elizabethans were not allowed to wear what clothes they liked. Their clothing and items of apparel were dictated by the Elizabethan Sumptuary Laws which governed the style and materials worn. The Elizabethan Sumptuary Clothing Laws were used to control behaviour and to ensure that a specific class structure was maintained. English Sumptuary Laws governing the clothing that Elizabethans wore were well known by all of…

    • 453 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Elizabethan Era

    • 2116 Words
    • 9 Pages

    The Golden Age or Elizabethan Era. The Elizabethan Era (1558-1603) was a time of cruel punishments, riveting people, such as Arabella Stuart, and fashion statements. Crimes in the Elizabethan Era were not taken lightly, and the punishment was usually meant to teach the public a lesson. Common crimes such as theft, adultery, forgers, and fraud could result in a death sentence. Even stealing bird eggs out of a bird nest could result in death (Elizabethan Crime). The Elizabethan government soon made…

    • 2116 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Better Essays