Stamp Act Apush

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Chapter 7 terms & Key Points
Admiralty Courts Stamp Act and Sugar Act offenses were tried in this court. Juries were not allowed and the burden of proof was on the defendant. All were assumed to be guilty until proven innocent. Trial by jury and innocent until proven guilty were basic rights that the British people everywhere had held dear.
Boston Port Act One such law was the Boston Port Act. It closed the Boston harbor until damages were paid and order could be ensured.
British East India Company If the company collapsed, the London government would lose much money. Therefore, the London government gave the company a full monopoly of the tea sell in America.
Committe of Correspondence Created by the American colonies in order to maintain
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Nonimportation policies against the Stamp Act; politically important b/c it aroused revolutionary fervor among many ordinary American men and women
Quartering Act legislation that required colonists to feed and shelter British troops; disobeyed in New York and elsewhere
Quebec Act aroused intense American fears b/c it extended Catholic jurisdiction (guaranteeing free practice) and a non-jury judicial system into the western Ohio country (Canada)
Red coats popular term for British regular troops, scorned as "lobster backs" and "bloody backs" by Bostonians and other colonials
Roman Catholic religion that was granted toleration in the trans-Allegheny West by the Quebec Act, arousing deep colonial hostility
Samuel Adams zealous defender of the common people's rights and organizer of underground propaganda committees; architect of American Revolution (mainly by manipulation)
Sons and Daughters of Liberty male and female organizations that enforced the nonimportation agreements, sometimes by coercive means
Stamp Act legislation passed in 1765, repealed the next year after colonial resistance made it impossible to enforce; greeted in the colonies by the nonimportation agreements, the Stamp Act Congress, and the forced resignation of stamp
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Fought in both the American patriot and British loyalist military forces
What led Grenville to propose the Sugar Act, Quartering Act, and Stamp Act? Large British debt incurred defending the colonies in the French and Indian War.
What led to a gradual development of a colonial sense of independence years before the revolution? America's distance from Britain and the growth of colonial self-government.
What precipitated the Battle of Lexington and Concord? British attempt to seize the colonial militia's gunpowder supplies.
What precipitated the first real shooting btw the British and American colonists? British attempt to seize colonial supplies and leaders at Lexington and Concord.
What resulted in the printing of large amounts of paper currency and skyrocketing inflation? Continental Congress's reluctance to tax Americans for

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