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Sigmund Freud and Phobias

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Sigmund Freud and Phobias
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This essay will cover the topics of Sigmund Freud and phobias. Freud is one of the most familiar psychoanalysts. How did Freud influence the study of psychology? How did he analyze phobias? How are phobias acquired? How are phobias treated today? Research was conducted using books and electronic sources. Sigmund Freud is one of the best known psychoanalysts. He had very radical ideas for his time. Freud is associated with the idea that psychological problems stem from sexual desire. Freud even hypothesized that phobias are a result of sexual feelings. (Rathus, 2008) Are phobias caused by sexual needs, or is there something else that causes people to have phobias? Sigmund Freud was born May 6, 1856, in Freiberg, Moravia (now the Czech Republic). Freud grew up a very confused child. His father married a woman 20 years younger than himself. His father had sons that were as old as his new bride. Freud thought his half-brothers were more compatible as a mate with his mother. Freud himself questioned if his new little sister was produced from his father or half-brother. His childhood confusion led him to investigate his own thoughts and the thoughts of other people. (Gay, P., 1988) Freud used psychoanalysis in patients, which allowed them to openly speak about their memories in a relaxed environment. Freud’s psychoanalyst approach is still used today. Summer’s (2006) states, “Freud found that as the patient grew closer to the traumatic material, repression increased, and the analyst’s intervention was required. As each resistance was overcome, a new zone was reached in which the patient could associate freely, but as that process approached painful material, the resistance intensified, and the analyst was needed to break through the new barrier.” (p. 328) But Freud was not satisfied with just analyzing people’s thoughts. He wanted to know what motivated the repression of feelings. Freud thought the three psychic structures: the id,



Cited: Gay, P. (1988). Freud: A life for our time. Markham, Ontario: Penguin Books Canada. Marcovitz, H. (2009). Phobias. San Diego: ReferencePoint Press. Rathus, S. A. (2008). Psychology: Concepts & connections. New York: Thompson Wadsworth. Summers, F. (2010, October 14). Freud 's relevance for comtemporary psychoanalytic technique. Chicago, IL, USA.

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