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Segregation Inequality And The Civil Rights Movement

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Segregation Inequality And The Civil Rights Movement
What happened 52 years ago? What was going on 52 years ago? Segregation, Inequality and The Civil Rights Movement. 52 years ago on August 28th 1963 Martin Luther King Jr made his famous “I Have a Dream” speech. He did not change everything, but he changed a lot. Although some people believe equality is acquired, in reality it has not been achieved according to Martin Luther King Jr's dream. This is evident due to Martin's figurative language, diction, and effective lines. Martin Luther King Jr had a dream that “My 4 little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by their color of their skin, but the content of their character.” (Luther 20) In the world now kids are treated equal but boys and girls and men and

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