Renaissance And Enlightenment

Good Essays
Devin Golden
18 November 2014
Professor Z
Rhetorical Perspective

Renaissance

The Enlightenment and Renaissance era 's. Two completely different era 's as far as time periods, but actually similar in how they developed rhetoric. These two era 's focused a lot on education to develop, and used past rhetorician 's views, and philosophies to do so. The Enlightenment era focused a lot on argumentation. This period was about an intellectual change going on in the world. According to dictionary.com, enlightenment was, a philosophical movement of the 1700s that emphasized the use of reason to scrutinize previously accepted doctrines and traditions and that brought about many humanitarian reforms. During this period of intellectual change in the world, Rhetoricians studied themes, like expression, and the standards of proof for arguments (pg 184). Vico, theorized to the Renaissance, and even went further back to Cicero.Yet, people like Sheridan, wanted to raise the status of the English language. Blair and Kames wanted to grow the appreciation for British literature, and Campbell wanted to give the appropriate insights of English philosophy (pg 170). Yet, Britain, during this time was growing as an empire in the world, and wanted to be recognized for its language and institutions they made, to be equal to all of Europe. George Campbell interest in the scientific site of rhetoric of a humans mind, is close to Plato 's speculations about psyche in which each part gives out its own rhetoric (pg. 184). Whately saw that rhetoric would be the center of arguments. He felt that rhetoric would dominate in arguments that involved concerns and skills (174). Belletristic Movement 's, however, were interested in the language of rhetoric, much like Gorgias and Longinus. The 18th century sees rhetoric at the head of educational concerns. Going through chapter 8 of the textbook, it appears that rhetoric really never died out. It just evolved into the next phase that it was



Cited: Whately: Elements of Rhetoric. (n.d.). Retrieved November 16, 2014, from http://prelimsandbeyond.wordpress.com/2008/12/30/whately/ The Importance of Marcus Tullius Cicero - The Imaginative Conservative. (n.d.). Retrieved November 17, 2014, from http://www.theimaginativeconservative.org/2013/02/the-importance-of-marcus-tullius-cicero.html Nordquist, R. (n.d.). Enlightenment rhetoric. Retrieved November 15, 2014, from http://grammar.about.com/od/e/g/Enlightenment-Rhetoric.htm Herrick, James A. The History and Theory of Rhetoric: An Introduction. 3rd ed. Boston: Allyn and Beacon, 2005. 167-186. Print.

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