Recognition of Deaf People

Good Essays
Omobolanle (Ore) Ogunkanmi
Recognition of Deaf People
The website deafpeople.com promotes the people active in the deaf community and those who make deaf history. The people recognized do not have to be completely deaf. Hearing people are also recognized which is good because it encourages people to do good deeds for the promotion of deaf history.
The website has a brief summary and highlights current day issues of the deaf community but most importantly, it has six different categories that focuses on specific achievements. I will go into detail about each one.
Category 1: Deaf People in History: This discusses groundbreakers of the deaf community. There are many profiles on deaf people, you click on it and can read about what they accomplished. Some of the prestigious people include: LeRoy Colombo, 1905 – 1974. He was a lifeguard and despite being deaf, credited to save 907 lives. The people he helped rescued did not show good gratitude, they paid him $1.00, 2 cans of beer etc. That did not stop him, even after retiring; he was still alert for people who needed help. Another advocate recognized is Nancy Becker, 1947 – 2008. Though she went to a strictly-oral school, she learned to sign on the sly. At the age of 16, she enrolled in the American School for the Deaf where she was able to sign freely. She advanced quickly in her career, coordinated Northeastern University’s American Sign Language Program, helping it to gain official recognition in Massachusetts.
Category 2: Deaf People in Action: This commemorates living deaf people active in their various fields of study. Lauren Simms is a teacher and advocate for the deaf community. She graduated from Indiana School for the Deaf, went on to earn her degree in Elementary Education. As an African American, she is an authority on Bilingual-Bicultural education. She has made learning ASL a wonderful experience for her students. John Yeh, a native of Taiwan, moved to the U.S.A from Brazil in 1962. At that time, he



Cited: Deafpeople.com http://deafpeople.com/

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