Rawl's Justice Is Fairness

Good Essays
Topics: Law, Dalai Lama
Phil.104 Word Count:

Take Home Exam # 1: Essay-2

John Rawls never claimed to know the only way to start a society, but he did suggest a very sound and fair way to do so. He based his just scenario on two principles of justice. His first principle of justice was that everyone should have the same rights as others. His following policy decision was that in the event of any inequalities, they should be to the benefit to everybody, and available to all people in the society. This original Rawl's approach to justice has been highly revered by philosophers to this day. This is mostly because Rawl's has thought up one of the fairest Utopia since the days of Socrates. This is not an easy of a task as it sounds. Though when analyzed by even the most naïve philosophers, it seems that Rawl's scenario base of principles are pretty obvious and simple. Maybe because some of these same principles can be found in present day society. The United States tries to pride itself in maintaining these two principles at all costs. In some countries even regarding these principles as fair can cause you to go away for a very long time. The most commonly known to the term "political prisoner" is Gedhun Choekyi
Niyami, the eleventh Panchen Lama, as proclaimed by the Dalai Lama in 1995. The record holding youngest political prisoner is a nine-year-old Chinese boy seized by the Chinese Government. A parent should have no fear of losing a child like this. Under Rawl's system, tragedies such as this are virtually impossible. Under the first principle that states the rights of all are equal. Rawl's principles were found justified by visualizing real people forming a system of laws including the ramifications of a "justified complaint". A justified complaint is an accusation by a member of society against another member of society. To have a system of justice the society must have means of answering the beckoning of the populace. If a society does not attend to the offense

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Better Essays

    Justice As Fairness

    • 1856 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Justice as Fairness John Rawls’s theory regarding justice is concluded with the idea of justice as fairness. Justice, according to Rawls, includes a conception of the knowledge that “all social goods are to be distributed equally unless an unequal distribution of any or all of these goods is to the advantage of the least favored” (Princeton Readings, 697). His theory prioritizes three principles: freedom, equality, and the difference principle to solidify his claims. Rawls’s attempt to reach an…

    • 1856 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Justice and Fairness

    • 2551 Words
    • 11 Pages

    INTRODUCTION: What is justice? This may seem like a simple question to answer but for many in today’s society it is not. Individuals throughout society have their own distinctive explanation of justice. It is a word in which, to every person, has a different meaning. Although "Justice" has a vast list of meanings, it can somewhat be defined. Loosely, it can be defined as “the principal of fairness and the ideal of moral equity.” In our world today they are many ways we have seen how justice work into our…

    • 2551 Words
    • 11 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    Rawl's Theory of Justice

    • 3044 Words
    • 13 Pages

    The Theory of Justice: Rawls Justice as Fairness: Introduction In a Theory of Justice, John Rawls argues that justice is to be understood in terms of fairness. A just society will be a society which is based upon principles. The principles are the best formulation of a social system which is not based upon personal interests or specific moral belief. These two principles are to serve as a framework for the construction and reformation of institutions. Rawls argues that the two principles of…

    • 3044 Words
    • 13 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Justice as Fairness

    • 514 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Justice As Fairness John Rawls made a significant difference in the way society views justice. He wanted people to keep in mind that his persuading arguments on the principles of justice come from the original hypothetical positions. The liberties he claims rational self interested people would include were things such as religion and the freedom of speech. He didn’t like the idea of utilitarianism for the reason of it leaving the minorities “destitute” and without help”. He also said that if…

    • 514 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    Justice as Fairness

    • 540 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Harvard philosopher John Rawls (1921-2002 ) developed a conception of justice as fairness in his now classic work A Theory of Justice . Using elements of both Kantian and utilitarian philosophy, he has described a method for the moral evaluation of social and political institutions. Imagine that you have set for yourself the task of developing a totally new social contract for today's society. How could you do so fairly? Although you could never actually eliminate all of your personal biases and…

    • 540 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Justice and Fairness

    • 639 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Kristin Boston 4/5/12 Engwr 102 Names Why do names mean so much? A name is just a name right? Wrong, to people this can be a very soar subject. We fight from what our last name will be to a school mascot. What we name something is a big deal now a day. Names have a lot more meaning, like taking on your husband’s last name or keeping your own. We wouldn’t think that naming a school mascot would be a big deal but it can be, the same for choosing a last name. The meaning of names now mean…

    • 639 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Rawls - Justice as Fairness

    • 2771 Words
    • 12 Pages

    Peter Justice: Political Not Natural Abstract: Ken Binmore casts his naturalist theory of justice in opposition to theories of justice that claim authority on the grounds of some religious or moral doctrine. He thereby overlooks the possibility of a political conception of justice—a theory of justice based on the premise that there is an irreducible pluralism of metaphysical, epistemological, and moral doctrines. In my brief comment I shall argue that the naturalist theory of justice advocated…

    • 2771 Words
    • 12 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    Analysis of Justice as Fairness and Utilitarianism 1 There is a fine line…

    • 724 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Universality and Reversibility: Justice and Fairness The categorical imperative incorporates two criteria for determining moral right and wrong: universalizability and reversibility. Universalizability means the person's reasons for acting must be reasons that everyone could act on at least in principle. Reversibility means the person's reasons for acting must be reasons that he or she would be willing to have all others use, even as a basis of how they treat him or her. That is, one's reasons…

    • 5656 Words
    • 23 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Best Essays

    ' Political Liberalism is an answer to the most common criticism of his Theory of Justice as Fairness where critics argued that it was just another conception of justice that is incompatible with other doctrines. It failed to clarify the concept of the good in a reasonable pluralist society by not distinguishing between an independent political theory and a comprehensive moral theory addressing the problem of Justice. This leads Rawls to refine his initial theory in Political Liberalism and ground…

    • 3873 Words
    • 16 Pages
    Best Essays