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Pros And Cons Of Cultural Norms

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Pros And Cons Of Cultural Norms
Various civilizations have come and gone. We are divided into so many diverse groups in terms of our different countries, cultures, religions. And the laws of the groups we reside in define most of our lifestyle.
DISCOURSE: we have to look at each group with understanding of the environment that the people live in. It is a universal fact the society imposes on us certain accepted facts which become our right and wrong, our way of doing things. And these accepted theories do change with advancement in time. The give quote basically states that there is no right or wrong, these are basically cultural norms which define a particular society. So it warns about the dangers of assuming that our preferences are based upon some absolute rational standard.
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2) Implements the need of respecting all groups
This is because according to Franz Boas, moral beliefs in different civilizations exist as long as the people do and believe in them. There is actually no right and wrong eventually.

AGAINST ARGUMENTS:
1) Is it justified to accept cultural norms which may harm other groups and the world on a
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a) In Colonial America slavery was OK, women were not allowed to vote or own property, primogeniture was practiced, etc. and therefore these things were right.
b) This position requires that we accept moral codes as proper and cannot be improved.

SOME MORE EXAMPLES:
1) The significance of red color: Red is considered a color of celebration and is considered lucky or fortunate for most of the Asians while In the Middle East the color symbolism of Red is Danger and Evil.
2) Significance of number 4: Four is the sacred number of the Zia, an indigenous tribe located in the U.S. State of New Mexico. The Chinese, and the Japanese are superstitious about the number four because it is a homonym for "death" in their languages.
3) In America, eye contact suggests that you are paying attention and interested in what a person has to say. Yet, in other cultures, eye contact can be considered rude and a challenge of authority.
4) In some cultures the dead corpse is burnt while in some they are

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