Postmodern Art of the Sixties and Seventies

Good Essays
Topics: Art, Conceptual art
Postmodern Art of the Sixties and Seventies

Before the 19th century, most artists made artwork that depicted scenes

related to religion or mythology. Due to the popularization of the idea of the

subconscious mind, many artists began exploring dreams, symbolism, and

personal iconography as avenues for the depiction of their subjective experiences.

The notion that art should depict the world realistically was challenged as several

artists experimented with expressive use of color, nontraditional materials,

and new kinds of mediums and techniques for creating art. This went on to be

classified as modern art in which traditionally accepted forms of art were rejected

for an emphasis on individual expression.

Postmodern art is an art style which sought to contradict as well as share

certain aspects of modern art. In it, past styles and themes are used in a modern

day context and fine and high arts coexist with low arts and popular culture.

Conceptual art is a type of postmodern art where the concepts and ideas

that go into making an art piece are deemed more important than the actual

visual effect the art has. This is the art style of the piece of artwork that inspired

me: Ground Hog Day which was done in 1976 by Fred Spratt. It consisted of five

panels altering in shades of gray and brown with color variation in each of the

panels due to the use of various values. By using darker tones more often than

lighter tones, it can be inferred that the artist means to say that there will be

more winter ahead, as is found out on Groundhog Day. The artist uses something

simple to relay a bigger picture which is what I am attempting to do. In my

artwork I am depicting human nature as something that is essentially bad but has

the potential for becoming

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Good Essays

    Postmodern Art: A Public Art Medium So much has changed in the art world in the past few decades. Because of the rapid growth of technology, democracy and globalization, arts today are more mass-oriented, so that many resources and facilities for both the appreciation and the production of arts are made available and accessible to all. It is predictable that arts will play a more active role in this century. In fact, this notable shift in arts is one of a characteristic of Postmodernism. In general…

    • 483 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Postmodern

    • 3680 Words
    • 15 Pages

    The postmodern Since this book does not attempt to introduce different critical schools or historical periods of literature, it may seem inappropriate to include a chapter on the postmodern. In the following pages, however, we wish to suggest that this topic provides us with an invaluable set of terms for thinking about literary and other cultural texts, that to a significant degree it involves ways of thinking which are unavoidable in the twenty-first century. The word ‘postmodern’ itself…

    • 3680 Words
    • 15 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    Postmodern materialism and subsemantic cultural theory 1. Structuralist rationalism and the subcapitalist paradigm of reality In the works of Gibson, a predominant concept is the concept of patriarchialist truth. The primary theme of the works of Gibson is not narrative, but neonarrative. But the closing/opening distinction prevalent in Gibson's Neuromancer is also evident in Idoru, although in a more mythopoetical sense. Lyotard's model of subdialectic Marxism suggests that the significance…

    • 581 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    visual arts can be traced back as far as the inscribed carvings found on cave walls created by the Indigenous population of Australia approximately 46000 years ago. However, over the past few years, the use of text in art, also known as the art of typography, has become a frequent means of communication for artists in the creation of their works. Text within art can be projected, scrawled, painted, computerised and carved to the point that a work may be created of nothing but language. The art of typography…

    • 1913 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    POSTMODERN FILM

    • 545 Words
    • 4 Pages

    viewers that they are watching a film. TIME BENDING  Time travel provides another way to shape reality in postmodern film and can be linked to the characteristic of disjointed narrative EMOTIONAL DETACHMENT  Not being in touch with emotions / seemingly ‘emotionless’ characters  Emotional detachment often brought along by technology, violence, drugs and the media REALITY?  Postmodern films often ask questions about what is real.  The questions is often not answered by the end of the film…

    • 545 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    on an old couch that had most likely been passed down generation to generation, with each tear and rip being covered up with duct tape. The couch was less of a couch and more of a duct-tape based art piece at this point. The room itself was straight out of some post-apocalyptic version of the Seventies. A shag carpet, which at one point was probably one color, was what I was nervously resting my…

    • 773 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Berkeley in the Sixties

    • 448 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Beginning in the late 1950s, the idea of higher education had become something tangible and many middle and upper class students began to think of college education as a right, rather than a privilege. Those students arriving at Berkeley were extremely different than their parents were at their age, and because of its location, Berkeley became the most notable campus full of student energy and emotion. But it wasn't all fun for the students. Most of them were politically and socially conscious. They…

    • 448 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Postmodern Utopias

    • 1547 Words
    • 7 Pages

    Postmodern Utopias "A late twentieth century style and concept in architecture that represents a departure from modernism and it has a heart of general distrust of grand theories and ideologies as well as a problematical relationship with any notion of art," this is the Webster 's definition of the word, postmodern. Then we have a utopia, which is "an imaginary place or state of things in which everything is perfect." Utopia is also, a definition by Webster. The idea of a postmodern utopia is…

    • 1547 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Psychedelic Sixties

    • 1353 Words
    • 5 Pages

    scraps of the sixties. They are still being passed around - the music and the ideas.” - Bob Dylan (Hilburn, R. 1992) The ‘sixties’ is an era that is more commonly noted as a time period from 1963 through until 1974. It is an era that is recognised for the fashion, the music, the drugs and the changes that occurred in relation to society, technology, arts, film and…

    • 1353 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Better Essays

    Postmodern Architecture

    • 2284 Words
    • 7 Pages

    Postmodern architecture The essay examples we publish have been submitted to us by students. The essays are the students' work and are not examples of our expert essay writers' work. READ MORE Top of Form Bottom of Form Get a quote for your own custom essay here... Share/download essay: Tweet Print Download Email MEANING AND METAPHOR IN POSTMODERN ARCHITECTURE IN REFRENCE TO THE CENTRE POMPIDOU An Analysis into the Aesthetics of the postmodern architecture is by nature; inspired and, intrinsically…

    • 2284 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Better Essays