Preview

Plantation Laborers vs Industrial Workers

Satisfactory Essays
Open Document
Open Document
679 Words
Grammar
Grammar
Plagiarism
Plagiarism
Writing
Writing
Score
Score
Plantation Laborers vs Industrial Workers
DBQ: Plantation Laborers vs. Industrial Workers
Working and living conditions in the 1800s were bad for both plantation workers and factory workers had it particularly bad. Although there were many similarities in their lives, there were many differences as well. Nonetheless both jobs were very hard work.
The lives of both groups were very much alike. Both worked long hard hours and did hard physical labor. The working conditions were harsh and unsafe in factories and on plantations. Solomon Northrup said that “when the moon is full, the often times labor till the middle of the night” and in factories worked from sunrise to sunset. Both had to work very long hours, they also were both treated very unfairly. Solomon Northrup also speaks about how the slaves were only allowed practice religions on Sabbath days and were only fed cold bacon. And Rev William Scoresby showed through his writing that factories weren’t fair for everyone. There were many more similarities in their lives but as well as similarities there were many differences.
There were many different groups of people who worked in factories in the 1800s like immigrants and young girls. They worked long hard hours in very unsafe conditions in factories up in the north. In the regulations for employees in the Lewiston Mills it says except for workers under age 16 “are considered as agreeing to labor as many hours each day, and for each and every day’s work, as the Company may require, not exceeding eleven hours a day” the time table of the Lowell Mils start work at 6:30AM and finish work at 6:30PM so they worked 11-12 hour days in the factories. That means they spent 50% or their time in these factories, also the factories were not very safe. The industrial revolution began in the 1820s but they didn’t begin implementing safety regulations until decades afterwards. Many of the workers were very poor, they weren’t paid very much. There was immigrant towns set up, where many groups of people from the

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Good Essays

    Around 1790, there were 700,000 slaves in the United States. And by 1860, the number of slaves moved up to 4 million (lecture). The reason why the numbers had changed so drastically was because of the cotton boom. The cotton growing was concentrated on plantations rather than the small farms. Around 75% of slaves lived in groups of around 10 or more slaves, which made changes in the African American slave communities and culture (lecture). With the slave communities developing, they were very unstable. Around 1 million slaves migrated from the upper to lower south, which split the communities and families apart. Since the slave communities were growing, Southern African American communities were different from other slave groups such as Cuba where they constantly imported slaves from Africa. With being a slave, it resulted in a lot of health challenges but the planters tried to keep them healthy enough to work. The death rate for the slave children were rather high because the women worked hard and were not nourished enough. Their masters provided them with food and supplemented the food by growing and hunting (lecture). The slave children did not work the fields at the start of their lives. They were to observe how to survive as slaves. They learned what the penalties were for disobedience and observed how white men violated black women. They saw how slaves were sold away for punishment and also for profit. The older children were to take care of the younger ones and there was no schools for the slave kids. Adult slaves served as servants, artisans, skilled workers, or most were field workers. Most of the skilled workers were men rather than women. Around 75% worked in the field directly affected by the cotton plantation labor system (lecture). With the cotton, it demanded a year rounds worth of labor. The owners divided the slaves up into 20-25 slaves. At harvest they would work 18-hour days. In the evening the women would…

    • 822 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    2. Female workers in Lowell, MA can be compared to slaves in the south in many ways but they are also very different. The conditions that the women in Lowell and slaves had to live in were very unsanitary and unbearable. The woman even felt like slaves. They were constantly watched as were slaves and they were also forced to go to church. Unlike slaves they were paid, even though they were paid very little because they could do the work of a man but get paid less, they still got paid. They had choices of what jobs to do where slaves were assigned to certain jobs. The women got some free time and even a 30 minute lunch break while slaves had very little or no brakes at all.…

    • 519 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    In Victorian times there was a big gap between middle and lower working class. The working day was 12-hours long, but during the winter the days were shorter because if the shorter daylight hours. They were disciplined a lot because if they were late for work then the gates would already be locked so they would loose their pay for that day. The life for the people that did work was better than the one of those who didn't. The conditions that they were working in were bad because there were children and women working long hours with dangerous equipment.…

    • 925 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    How were the experiences of indentured servant and slaves in the Chesapeake and the Caribbean similar? In what ways were they different?…

    • 121 Words
    • 1 Page
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Firstly when immigrants were coming over they had no food, no home, no job so they would work for very low wages;that does not mean that the conditions in the workplace have to be unsafe and people like Andrew carnegie he was just exploiting the immigrants by making them work for seven-days a week , and daily work 12 or more hours. They were also not entitled to vacation, sick leave, unemployment compensation, or reimbursement for injuries suffered on the job. Lastly it was not only adult workers in the factories children as young as 4 would be working in these factories “an average of 675…

    • 667 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    Both the indentured servants and black slaves did very similar agricultural work. They were treated dreadfully and were not able to change their employer. They didn 't get to choose what labor they did and they were not able to own the product from their labor. Black slaves were captured in Africa and brought on boats to come to America. A lot of black slaves didn 't make it to America because of sickness and diseases on the boat. Indentured servants were often forced to go with their owner or were kidnapped and put on ships, where the boats were unsanitary. During this time in America there was too much land for the amount of people so when they servants and slaves were brought over they had to sustain the crops and the fields. They worked long hours in the cold winters and in the brutal summer days in the fields. Both the indentured servants and black slaves were scarred mentally for being taken from their families and coming to a new land. They were physically beaten if they tried to escape or didn 't do their work well. Sometimes they were beaten without a reason. Both groups were treated badly and couldn 't do anything about it.…

    • 836 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Both would be required to work long, tiresome days in the sun on the plantations, collecting cash crops such as tobacco or cotton. Neither job title would grant you a salary; instead of receiving cash, both slaves and indentured servants merely received food and shelter from their masters. Another similarity between these two groups was the classlessness of their societies. The roles of men and women were less clearly defined in both slave and indentured servant communities, leading women to have a more influential and respected role in these…

    • 645 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    There are many similarities, yet also many differences. Some similarities include that both Jacobs and Douglass worked hard to escape to freedom and were successful. But, a difference would include the way they thought of their freedom. Jacobs thought that the North imitated the customs of slavery, being that colored people had the right to purchase a ticket, yet had to ride in the filthiest sections of the train. Though in the South, they were able to ride in the train cars behind the whites without having the “privilege” of paying. Yet, Douglass didn’t complain about the train cars, because he was much too nervous about being captured, so they have different viewpoints of the North when they first arrive. Another difference would be that Jacobs had children before she escaped and she had to leave them behind, but Douglass had no children to leave behind and was able to cut his ties much more freely. Lastly, another similarities is they both faced the dangers of being captured and sent back to their owners. In conclusion, both Jacobs and Douglass had alike yet disparate experiences with slavery and pathways to…

    • 588 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Life Under Slavery 1800s

    • 638 Words
    • 3 Pages

    During the 1800s, slavery was very prominent in the southern states. The life for slaves was very strenuous; they were forced to work numerous days in the cotton fields. Their families were nonexistent as well as their marriage lives. Many rebellions were planned, but the majority were just conspiracies. Slaves made up 47% of the South’s total population. Slavery impacted the United States in a plethora of ways.…

    • 638 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The atmosphere and working conditions that these industrial workers worked in were constantly changing and were profoundly affected by technological advances. Technological advancements, like the train, linked states together far and wide. Managers could now ship across the nation with ease; this opportunity called for a more efficient production rate, as an assembly line would be put into place in many factories. As the growing demand for products increased, so did the number of workers. The only thing that was not increasing however was wages. It wasn't uncommon for children to work in factories, though it was men who mainly compromised the field of blue-collar labor. With the invention of typewriters and telephone switchboards, millions of stenographers and "hello girls" discovered economic opportunity. The machines that were introduced to factories made work for the American industrial worker much easier, albeit tedious and tiring. Their lives practically revolved around the blow of their boss's whistle. Despite these technological advances, work days were long and tiresome, and the laborers felt they weren't being paid fairly. Thus labor unions were formed and many workers would go on strike, forcing factories to either comply to the blue-collars, or hire children and immigrants. For better or worse, technological changes impacted the life of the American industrial worker.…

    • 574 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    During the industial revolution the working conditions and "wages" were terrible and unfair towards workers of any age, gender or race. This was because there were nothing stoping rich imperialists from being dictated and forced to do whatever the owners saw fit. A example of this was the childerns wages ... one shilling a week back in victorain england a single room for "mechanic" (manual labourer) in lodgings cost from 3 to 6 shillings so theoriticlaly it would take a laborer 3 weeks to afford a room by themselves but most money earned was sent home to farms to keep a steady income flowing due to the industrial revolution many weavers went out of buisness so the income needed to found another way. The way most family choose was to send their…

    • 151 Words
    • 1 Page
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    During the 19th century industrial revolution, the Lowell-System was instituted to increase productivity primarily in the manufacturing of textiles. This entailed the employment of women and children of mostly agricultural backgrounds to work at the looms or other industrial machinery. Known as “mill girls” or “factory girls”, these women would often work under strenuous conditions for up to 14 hours a day. Eventually, these conditions would later lead to factory/work reforms due to the hazardous conditions and health problems it caused for the women and children working under this system.…

    • 90 Words
    • 1 Page
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    The White Slavery

    • 630 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Next are the parallels between the way the factory workers and the slaves were viewed by the upper class and the government. Annie Bessant says, Born in slums, driven to work while still children, undersized because underfed, oppressed because helpless, flung aside as soon as worked out, who cares if the die or go on the streets, provided only that Bryant and May shareholders get their 23 percent. This is the view from the working class; they feel as if are treated like garbage. We do not see this opinion from the factory owners or the government. The government did little at first to promote fair treatment and wages for the children or adult factory workers. Many, like Thomas Babington Macaulay, argued that without the factories the girls would have no jobs resulting in even worse poverty. We see the same case made earlier for the black slaves. James Froude claims that the British system is good for the…

    • 630 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The conditions of the factories were normally bleak, gloomy, and hazardous to lives (Triangle shirtwaist coat fire for example) (document reader, 142). The discipline there (or depending on where they worked) could be very severe such as whipping. There are comparisons to the Lowell workers in regards to the Irish peasants, Russian serfs and English factory workers, mostly it is because the conditions for working, wages and others are either the same or worse (document reader,…

    • 982 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Found mostly in urban areas, many were women Divided by complexion and shades of colour…

    • 1968 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Powerful Essays