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Osorio's 'Value Of Hawai' I

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Osorio's 'Value Of Hawai' I
The introduction of the “Value of Hawai'i” talks about how the cover of this book has a deeper meaning to it than what it is perceived as. For instance, the cover talks about many changes that has happened, the betrayal, the endeavors, abolishing the native language and how Hawai'i is portrayed as a paradise, but in paradise, there are still many issues people face. For example, America has agonized Hawaii as Osorio stated: “United states has ignored its own laws , and certainly the laws of a sovereign nation, to terrorize Hawaii and take possession of nearly half its property.” Altogether, Hawaii isn't always what it’s perceived to be.
Many things have changed since the forced annexation of Hawaii from the United States. Specifically, since

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