Mining Safety Report

Topics: Coal, Coal mining, Mining Pages: 24 (5969 words) Published: April 4, 2014


Table of Contents

Introduction to Report:

This project was researched through a variety of means that includes literary articles, books, company reports and websites. Much of the information was sourced from Australian news websites and databases. For the projection of financial costs, the annual reports of mining companies were used as a reference point. For instance, the $1,000 cost per employee per year was a round number that was taken after looking at companies such as BHP Biliton and Rio Tinto. Besides this, research into risk assessment theories and text books led to the development of the risk assessment model for this report. Interviews with friend’s parents that were working in the mining industry also provided valuable insight and information. For the hazards and risks segment, a combination of accident reports as well as personal visualization was used to determine the various risks and mitigating factors.

Background:
UG Coal Mining is a business conglomerate started by Abel Boniface in 1998 dealing with the mining, extraction, cleansing and processing of coal for local and export purposes. The firm’s main office sits at the heart of Perth’s Central Business District with 4 other branches in Sydney, Brisbane, Darwin and Adelaide. The organization enjoyed a record turnover of $2.2 billion for the financial year ended 2011/2012 having secured a huge resource contract with BHP Billiton (involving exports to China) for the next 10 years. With 150 employees and counting at its helm, UG Coal is set for an IPO listing in 2013. UG Coal Mining’s primary focus includes underground coal mining using room and pillar as well as long mining for extractions purposes. Its main operational areas covers, coal preparation, coal handling, precision mining engineering, warehousing and transportation. However, in view of Australia’s strict stance on mining injuries, UG Coal Mining has hired an OSH consultant to beef up its safety framework. In an opinion article in the Herald Sun, the Minerals Council was quoted in 1996 as having said that its vision involves fuelling a mining industry that is “free of fatalities, injuries and diseases”. Furthermore, “safety and health would be its top priority” (Howe, 2011). Coupled with the Department of Mines and Petroleum that manages and regulates the mining sector, the pressure is on mining companies to abide by the laws set and to have safety checks in place. The department of mines and petroleum maintains a database of any incident, report, injury or otherwise dating back to the 1980’s. It even advocates the Mines Safety & Inspection Act (1994) that places a duty of care on employers to ensure a safe working environment for employees. Non-compliance to set guidelines may result in severe punishment that includes the suspension of one’s license, a hefty fine or thorough investigations into the operations of the firm.

(Sample preliminary report from the Department of Mines & Petroleum involving mining incidents that is in full public view, on its online database) Operational Health & Safety System

After months of on-the ground research, theoretical and practical analysis, studies on safety cultures and models, the operational health and safety system recommended for UG Coal Mining revolves around a 5-pronged framework that includes:

Safety Management Structure-for the setting up of an OHS system (including the responsibilities of individuals involved) Risk Assessment Model- for identifying and controlling the site risks and hazards Safety Education & Culture-for training, coaching and mentoring staff, contractors and visitors Safety Investigation-for proper record keeping and documentation (with accident reports) Safety Sustenance- for implementing corrective actions highlighted in reports and records These 5 thrusts would be explained in detail in this report. Safety Management Structure

Chief Operating...

Bibliography: Canadian Centre for Occupational Health & Safety, 2009. Hazard and Risk. [Online]
Available at: http://www.ccohs.ca/oshanswers/hsprograms/hazard_risk.html
[Accessed 19 October 2012].
Howe, A., 2011. Worker deaths haunt our big miners. [Online]
Available at: http://www.heraldsun.com.au/opinion/deaths-haunt-our-big-miners/story-e6frfhqf-1226213572040
[Accessed 18 October 2012].
Mine Safety Training Inc, 2012. Training Programs. [Online]
Available at: http://www.mine-safety.com/about.html
[Accessed 15 October 2012].
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