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Latin American Culture Analysis

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Latin American Culture Analysis
Indigenous people, women, workers and peasants have played significant roles in politics as well as culture in Latin American nations. Some of the places affected by its people are Ecuador, and the Andean Region. Ecuador’s policies and culture was changed by its people. Ecuador was rich history in terms of revolutions. Originally Ecuador was primarily owned by the wealthy. During the first export era Cacao was a boom, however it was exported by an oligarchy of Cacao producers, These producers owned the export-inport trade and the banking system, and created the city of Guayaquil. They became incredibly wealthy, but employed workers with little pay. During the second export era, Bananas were in boom. During time intermarriages between …show more content…
However as time progress, political parties did emerge with similar ideologies to our Democrats and Republicans. In the mid 1990s was the rise of the Ecuador’s Indigenous Political Movement, which became a force to be reckoned with in politics. This was not the only Indigenous organization that made a difference in politics. The peasant movement that happened in the 1960s and 70s which started from agrarian reforms; modernize agriculture and liberated indigenous peasants. There were two main religious groups that gained power, which was the Catholic Church and Evangelism.The Catholic church decided to sever ties with the financial elites and help the peasants. The main goal was to improve the wellbeing of the peasants. In term the church improved education as well as create a strong infrastructure for the people. Because of these reforms the indigenous community improved, were able to establish the indigenous movements. The evangelicals, had a role in education as well. Due to their efforts the Education Foundation of Indigenous Evangelicals was formed, which is one of the most politically active foundations. Through the work of these foundations as well as others were able to establish a new constitution as well as members of the foundations obtaining seats Alianza Pais slate, Through their efforts they are improving the lives of indigenous people all over …show more content…
the Andes as well as Ecuador have been changed by the indigenous, women, workers and peasants to create policies and cultures. The only thing I could think of to help these people is to spread the word. How can the natural resources of another country be sucked dries by the monarchy that is America. How is the world watching and allowing this to take place! All I can do is watch, because in reality I have as much to blame as everyone else. Being ignorant about the world’s problems is the biggest sin I have committed. Now I must live on knowing that people are suffering because of the country I used to

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