Preview

Juvenile Justice Policy

Powerful Essays
Open Document
Open Document
2376 Words
Grammar
Grammar
Plagiarism
Plagiarism
Writing
Writing
Score
Score
Juvenile Justice Policy
The Juvenile Justice Policy Jason Austin The juvenile justice system in dealing with juvenile offenders has cyclically gone from a rehabilitative approach to a punitive approach a number of times since its inception (Jenson & Howard, 1998). Research by Bernard (1992), as cited in Jenson and Howard (1998), examined the history of the juvenile justice system from 1820 and found that when juvenile crime is determined to be high, the justice system responds with severe punishments and few rehabilitative approaches. This approach forces officials to either respond with harsh punishment or doing nothing at all. Eventually, the system is reformed and a greater amount of leniency takes effect. This continues until the final phase, as …show more content…
A merger would eliminate the differential treatment; the tendency of officials to want “to set an example” of the almost adult juvenile; and the difficulty of knowing the offender’s true age, which is often misrepresented in order to be handled in one system over the other (Hirschi & Gottfredson, 1993; Dawson, 1990). Merging the two systems would have the benefit of “providing for continuity of services”. At present, juvenile records are sealed so it is difficult to determine if the juvenile is headed toward serious problems. Furthermore, the juvenile, upon reaching the age of majority, has a clean slate, regardless of past record. But, even if the record were disclosed, there would be a tendency to discount the information in making a decision when viewing the individual as an adult (Roth, 1997; Dawson …show more content…
A possible approach would be a system of graduated sanctions, whereby the offenders are matched to appropriate punishments and treatments based on history and needs of the individual. This approach keeps in mind the founding philosophy of the juvenile justice system and can adequately address the present day offenders by balancing rehabilitation and punishment (Jenson & Howard,

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Satisfactory Essays

    It is argued that one of the main issues as to why the needs are not being met is because of the tensions in the juvenile justice system itself. Delinquent behavior must be responded to only when competing mandates and priorities. The main focus of the juvenile justice system is rehabilitation for the youth, in performing this it must be taken in account that while holding juveniles for their behavior the community must also be protected.…

    • 370 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Better Essays

    Persuasive Paper Part 1

    • 1260 Words
    • 6 Pages

    From the 1980s to the 1990s there has been a surge in minors who commit violent crimes as shown in a research study conducted by the Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch Currently. The information was based on federal and state correctional data related to race, history and nature of crimes committed by minors. The study showed inmates under the age of 18 in state prisons has more than doubled from 1985-1997. The study also shows that 61% of those minors admitted were convicted of violent offenses1. The Juvenile Court Act was founded in 18992 when the idea of reforming minors took place and the majority of crimes committed by minors were of minor misconduct. The justice systems were separated because adults were treated as criminals and minors were treated for rehabilitation. , created to rehabilitate and protect minors. The courts intended the system to be more informal and treat the juveniles rather than punish them. This system was not developed to undertake the current rise of…

    • 1260 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Best Essays

    The national trend towards getting tough on juvenile crime by altering the juvenile justice system to more closely mirror the adult system was examined in order to determine whether secure confinement of juvenile offenders is as effective as community-based rehabilitative and treatment programs for these youth. Politicians and public perceptions have allowed the juvenile justice system to evolve from one of reform based thinking to one of punishment based thinking, placing more young offenders in secure facilities than ever before. The social repercussions of secure confinement of juveniles, without the use of proper rehabilitative tools, including education and life-building skills, are evident as youth are being ‘set aside’ rather than being encouraged to become productive members of their communities.…

    • 3212 Words
    • 11 Pages
    Best Essays
  • Good Essays

    Juvenile Justice Center

    • 382 Words
    • 2 Pages

    The juvenile justice system and the adult justice system share their commonalities and differences. For example, the juvenile justice system makes it the point to rehabilitate instead of punishing juvenile delinquents. However, one must take into consideration that punishment is still a feasible concept within the juvenile system, but it is used prudently as a “last resort.” In instances of punishment for a teenager who is accused of an atrocious crime, he or she may be tried as an adult (Goldstein, 2007). According to Dr. Goldstein (2007) there are some similarities between the two justice systems as he states that “the police, judiciary, and corrections have discretion relative to decision making in both systems.”…

    • 382 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Juveniles Serving Life

    • 4252 Words
    • 18 Pages

    A juvenile court system was intentionally created and designed to accommodate offenders under a certain age, who committed certain offenses. Consideration of sentencing was based on future recidivism, and possible rehabilitation for proper functionality within society. Yet, the courts do not appear to be separating this judicial process and are sending these young individuals directly to adult criminal courts as a preemptory strike against the potential for future crimes, as well as the protection of society as a whole (Brink, 2004).…

    • 4252 Words
    • 18 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Better Essays

    Juvenile Justice System

    • 2095 Words
    • 9 Pages

    In today’s society, there are not that many distinctions between juveniles and adults when it comes to the criminal justice system. The main distinction between an adult and a juvenile is of course the age and the types of sentencing a juvenile may receive compared to an adult. The juvenile justice system has a tiered affect when it comes to sentencing but it relies heavily on the maturity and intellect of the juvenile. Due to that reason, there will always be a separate juvenile justice system to ensure the juvenile truly understands the nature of the crime and the consequences.…

    • 2095 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Juvenile and Adult Courts

    • 1736 Words
    • 7 Pages

    The “Juvenile and Adult Courts: A Comparative Analysis” paper will compare juvenile courts with adult courts. This paper will present an overview of the juvenile justice system, a point-by-point comparison between juvenile and adult courts. The adjudication process by which a juvenile is transferred to the adult court system. This paper will also discuss the implications of the following for youthful offenders: The trend of increasing the use of waivers, and the trend of remanding juveniles to adult court for processing. The last topic addressed in this paper will be the societal implications of abolishing juvenile court.…

    • 1736 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Better Essays

    Juvenile Justice Paper

    • 1496 Words
    • 6 Pages

    The rate of juvenile offenders has decreased in some states are since its spike in the early 1990’s. The purpose of the juvenile justice system is to better to preserve the rights of youthful offenders rights, so they are not just thrown into the adult jail/prison system. It also serves the purpose of giving these youthful offenders the chance to receive the proper treatment and rehabilitation that is needed in order to curb delinquent behavior prior to reaching adulthood or “age of maturity” as it is referred to in the juvenile justice system and it is has been totally designed for those purposes.…

    • 1496 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    The criminal justice system has a branch for juvenile offenders. Established in the early twentieth century; it is the responsibility of this division to decide the fates of youthful offenders. This is administered by family court with support of social workers and family. With the increased number of youthful, violent offenders, many are being processed and sentenced as adults. Important issues such as culpability, severity of the crime, accountability, constitutional rights of the offenders and victims, and probability of rehabilitation, need consideration. When deciding the fate of juvenile offenders, it is important to implement the course of action best suited for the rehabilitation of convicted youth.…

    • 1689 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    The juvenile and adult court has similarities and differences between the two systems. The Administration of juvenile justice has dependent youths that are in families, and rehabilitation is the goal. The criminal justice system does not see rehabilitation as the primary aim. General deterrence is known to work, and sanctions are proportional to the offense. In both courts, constitutional rights are permitted, criminals are held accountable, and public safety is their primary goal (Snyder, 1999). The juvenile system has many prevention programs. The adult facilities have prevention activities aimed for deterrence. Both systems offer educational approaches for criminal behaviors. The adult system allows all access for all information by the…

    • 240 Words
    • 1 Page
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Although based on the adult criminal justice system, the juvenile justice process works differently. Juveniles can end up in court by way of arrest, truancy or for curfew violations or running away. A youth may also be referred to the juvenile court system by school officials or a parent or guardian for being continuously disobedient. The juvenile justice process involves several different steps including intake, detention, adjudication, disposition and aftercare following release from a juvenile correctional facility. In this paper we will breakdown the numerous steps involved in the juvenile justice process as well as compared some processes to the adult justice process (terminology).…

    • 1290 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    There are many similarities and differences between the adult and juvenile justice systems. Siegel and Welsh, (2008 p. 272), states that, “the components of the adult and the juvenile criminal processes are similar, but the juvenile system has a separate organizational structure.” There are more differences than there are similarities, but only because the juvenile system is there to rehabilitate the child and not punish them. The adult system is aimed at “punishing the guilty”, (Siegel, Welsh, 2008, p. 275). The juvenile system is very lenient on the offenders, but there are also significant similarities within the two systems. Juveniles are divided into delinquents and status offenders, adults are considered criminals.…

    • 585 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Juvenile corrections system has various methods to support the underlying goal of rehabilitation and reform. This system affects the entire community in its successes and failures; members of the society should take time to understand what efforts are being made to reform these young offenders and what obstacles must be eliminated to make it more effective. The following paper will attempt to summarize community based treatment, confinement of juveniles and programs used to follow up with those released from institutions.…

    • 1237 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Juvenile incarceration has created a lot of uncertainties in the legal justice system. This is because it is often assumed that indeed there are several persons that are underage that at the time of the crime did not have the proper mental reasoning to appreciate that indeed they were committing a crime. For this reason, there has been several problems regarding Juvenile incarceration and it has been argued that there is a need to re-evaluate and ensure that indeed the problems that affect the system are given the proper judicial involvement and justice. . This paper is going to examine how different it is from adults and juvenile when it comes to…

    • 575 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Juvenile Justice System

    • 1817 Words
    • 8 Pages

    Moreover, polls in several states indicate that large majorities support prevention programs and early intervention efforts, and support restorative justice programs over prison time for non-violent youthful offenders because they are not comfortable with incarcerating juveniles with adults. It is sadly unsurprising that in today's youth justice system, male individuals from ethnic minorities receive the harshest punishment, and are often seen as impossible to rehabilitate, or undeserving of the second or third chances that other demographic groups of troubled youth receive. Under the law, all young people between the ages of 8 and 17 or 18 are equally deserving of rehabilitative efforts, and are equally capable of a law-abiding adulthood. Unfortunately, the subjectivity inherent in the justice system renders this equality null and void, dealing out harsh sentences for older teenagers even when they are first-time offenders. The current juvenile justice process may be unconstitutional, and it definitely does not reduce crime or enhance public…

    • 1817 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Powerful Essays

Related Topics