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International Business Management
Anti-capitalism
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This article lists ideologies opposed to capitalism and describes them briefly. For arguments against capitalism, see criticism of capitalism.

An Industrial Workers of the World poster (1911)
Anti-capitalism describes a wide variety of movements, ideas, and attitudes that oppose capitalism. Anti-capitalists, in the strict sense of the word, are those who wish to completely replace capitalism with another system. Contents [hide] * 1 Conservatism and traditionalism * 2 Ecofeminism * 3 Fascism * 4 Participatory economics and inclusive democracy * 5 Religion * 6 Socialism * 6.1 Anarchism * 6.2 Communism * 7 Anti-globalization movement * 8 See also * 9 References * 10 Further reading * 11 External links |
Conservatism and traditionalism
There are strands of conservatism that are uncomfortable with liberal capitalism. Particularly in continental Europe, many conservatives have been uncomfortable with the impact of capitalism upon culture and traditions. The conservative opposition to the Renaissance, the Enlightenment, the American Revolution, the French Revolution, and especially the development of individualistic liberalism as a political theory and as institutionalized social practices sought to retain traditional social hierarchies, practices and institutions. There is also a conservative protectionist opposition to certain types of international capitalism.
Paleoconservatives and other traditionalist ideologies are often in opposition to capitalist ethics and the effects they have on society as a whole, which they see as infringing upon or decaying social traditions or hierarchies that are essential for social order. Some of these ideas are intertwined with religious communism. More nationalist-oriented groups believe that aspects of capitalism, such as free trade infringe upon national sovereignty, that domestic industries and national



References: 1. ^ Mies, Maria; Maria Mies and Vandana Shiva (1993). Ecofeminism. p. 298. ISBN 1-85649-156-0.  2 3. ^ Takis Fotopolous International Journal of Inclusive Democracy vol.4 no.2, [1] (2008). 6. ^ Newman, Michael. (2005) Socialism: A Very Short Introduction, Oxford University Press, ISBN 0-19-280431-6 7 14. ^ Tony Cliff, State Capitalism in Russia (1955) Further reading

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