Preview

Improve Er Wait Times

Better Essays
Open Document
Open Document
1018 Words
Grammar
Grammar
Plagiarism
Plagiarism
Writing
Writing
Score
Score
Improve Er Wait Times
Ways to Improve Emergency Room Wait Times
Veronica Padlo
California College San Diego
MAN324
May 2, 2010
Dru Macasieb

Abstract It seems that emergency room wait times are ridiculous and there is no need for it. My mom has been in and out of the hospital since last April and the most annoying thing in the world is having to wait 3 hours to see a doctor. This paper is going to focus on ways to improve emergency room wait times. With all the advancements in technology you would think that every hospital has an app to download but that’s not the case.

Ways to Improve Emergency Room Wait Times “Across the country, the average emergency room wait time is now 222 minutes- that’s 3 hours, 42 minutes. (Costello, 2006) My mom has been sick recently and has been in and out of the hospital. When she is not feeling well, we will sit home and debate whether or not to go to emergency because we don’t want to wait for hours. This paper will discuss ways in which emergency room wait times can be reduced by using technology to improve efficiencies and speed up patient processing, treating patients based on the seriousness of the injury and improvement of the overall customer service and management of the hospital flow.
Technology
Technology seems to have taken over these days. Smart phones, tablets, Nook, Kindle, MP3 players, laptops, and now smart televisions are just a few of the many advances so far. Hospitals should be using technology to increase efficiency. For example, “Scripps Mercy Hospital in San Diego and Chula Vista, CA, has implemented a computerized bed monitoring system that allows staff members to immediately fill vacant beds and keep patients moving throughout the hospital.” (some hospitals implement unique measures to improve ER wait times, 2008) By implementing this strategy hospital wait times have decreased. This makes the process more efficient by letting the ER now right away when a bed is available. “At Boston’s Beth Israel/Deaconess Medical



References: al, N. M. (2010). Reducing waiting time at an emergency department using design for Six Sigma and discree event simulation. Int. J. Six Sigma and Competitive advantage, 6, 91-104. Costello, T. (2006, November 20). Hospitals work to improve ER wait times. Retrieved from NBCNightlyNew-msnbc.com: www.msnbc.msn.com/id15817906/ns/nightly-news/#.T59MkauVwYk Rice, S. (2011, January 13). Don 't die waiting in the ER. Retrieved from CNN.com: www.cnn.com/2011/HEALTH/01/13/emergency.room.ep/index.html some hospitals implement unique measures to improve ER wait times. (2008, December 17). Retrieved from www.hcpro.com: hcpro.com/print/...Some-hospitals-implement-unique-measuress-to-improve-ER-wait-times.html

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Powerful Essays

    Problem: Patients with potentially life-threating injuries and illnesses are waiting for over an hour for treatment in Emergency Department at AMH! Although long wait times seemed to be readily excuses by many physicians due to complexity of managing emergency room and processes and clinical staff, it is still unacceptable for the patients.…

    • 1789 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    When looking at the intake process of patients, into a medical facility, it is an obvious realization that we have made progress in making the patients experience proficient and pleasant. However there is always room for improvement in any type of facility. How many times have you been to the doctor and waited long than 20 minutes? Have you ever been rescheduled because you were 20 minutes late? This paper will provide a simplistic strategy that will help the implement to improve patient efficiency to minimize the patients wait time. This strategy will not only help new patients, but it will provide convenience during check in for new patients.…

    • 758 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Case Study 1

    • 2103 Words
    • 9 Pages

    The use of technology in healthcare and the delivery of this technology to healthcare present many challenges, technology contributes to improving the quality of healthcare but it does impact healthcare cost, however there are some trade-offs. “The term “medical technology” refers to procedures, equipment, and processes by which medical care is delivered.” (Goyen, Mathias. 2009) Some of the current challenges in healthcare are patient privacy and protection when using wireless technology, tracking patients and staff while in the healthcare environment, and transitioning medical records to electronic medical records to help reduce mistakes and improve patient safety. Technology does contribute to improving the quality of healthcare but it does impact healthcare cost, which has been one of the reasons why insurance premiums have been high. (Goyen, Mathias. 2009) Some of the trade-offs are the medical advancements that can be made with medical technology. (Thomas, RL. 2011)…

    • 2103 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Hcs 212 Health Care Essay

    • 814 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Going back hundreds of years, we can trace the history of health care. Although it has evolved over the years, it all has a common goal; to heal those who are ill. Technology is one of the major evolutions and now plays a big role in the health care system. It helps patients to be more involved with their healthcare. They can make appointments, follow up on test results, and contact their doctors. Back then, they didn’t even have all the medicine we have now, let alone the technology. We can only imagine what is in store for the future.…

    • 814 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Better Essays

    St. Vincent’s Medical Center, a 501 bed facility located in Jacksonville, Florida, provides general medical and surgical care to the North Florida Region. St. Vincent’s admits over 26,000 patients annually. The average occupancy rate is approximately 84% with the Emergency Department (ED) peeking at 100% for approximately 4-12 hours daily. The hospital is struggling with availability of bed space. This shortage of available beds creates a bottleneck in the ED on high census days. Bottlenecks are created in the ED when there is a shortage of inpatient beds to place admitted ED patients. Thus, patient flow, or throughput, is becoming more and more important.…

    • 2916 Words
    • 12 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    capella unit 2

    • 319 Words
    • 2 Pages

    [I will be investigating on the topic of how to reduce Hospital ER wait time. This topic is personal to me and I would like to gain knowledge because I think it can be applied at a future workplace. Patients who check into a hospital’s ER room often experiences a long wait time in an emergency room waiting. I want to research if theirs a faster way to make the process for a Hospital ER wait time. I think in the future if I ever want to work in the Hospital ER Department this research would improve my career advancement on many different levels. ER wait time can be greatly reduced by adding staff members to the ER department, as well as recruiting more on-call physicians and specialists. I want to research into ways in which emergency room wait times can be reduced by using technology to improve efficiencies and speed up patient processing, treating patients based on the seriousness of the injury and improvement of the overall customer service and management of the hospital flow. Hospitals should be using technology to increase efficiency and I think that can reduce Hospital ER department wait time and their will be more satisfied patients.]…

    • 319 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    References: Okotie, O. T.(2008). The Effect of Patient Arrival Time on Overall Wait Time and Utilization of Physician and Examination Room Resources in the Outpatient Urology Clinic. Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2602945/…

    • 963 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Emergency Room Boarding

    • 2062 Words
    • 9 Pages

    A major issue affecting hospitals in the United States today is the process of boarding patients in the emergency department (ED). It is the primary cause of overcrowding in a hospital and affects more than 90% of hospitals in America (Lowes, 2001). The practice of boarding or “holding” patients endangers the safety of hospital staff and the patients themselves. It causes delays in care and even worse ambulance diversions. Emergency department visits climbed fourteen percent from 1992 to 1999 (Lowes, 2001). This shows that boarding patients is a risk to the incoming ED patients.…

    • 2062 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Better Essays

    A visit to the emergency department (ED) is usually associated with negative thoughts by most people. It creates preconceived images of overcrowded waiting rooms and routine long waits for treatment (Jarousse, 2011). From 1996 to 2006, ED visits increased annually from 90.3 million to 119.2 million (32% increase). During this same time period, the number of EDs has declined by 186 facilities creating the age old lower supply and greater demand concept (Crane & Noon, 2011). There are many contributing factors that have led to an increase in ED visits. A few of these key drivers include lack of primary care access, rising of the uninsured population, dwindling mental health services, and the growing elderly population (Clinical Advisory Board, 2008). In response to these issues, hospital administrators are challenged to evaluate patient flow and identify opportunities to improve process strategies within the ED. This is where throughput evolved in healthcare and became the new buzzword for patient flow. In healthcare, throughput refers to the ED process that impacts patient flow (Jarousse 2011). The purpose of this concept analysis will be to explore throughput and discuss how it is critical for survival in the ED and beneficial to the overall financial success of the hospital.…

    • 2517 Words
    • 11 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Better Essays

    References: Baker, C. (2008 August). Some Surprises On Emergency Room Use. Retrieved August 30, 2008, from www.letstalkhealthcare.org…

    • 1061 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    We’ve all heard horror stories of the outrageous wait times in emergency rooms. According to a recent study done by Press & Ganey in 2007, the average time a patient spends in the ED is 4 hours, compared to 3.7 hours in 2006. What many patients don’t realize is they are seen in order of priority, which includes walk-ins. So for example, if you have a sprained ankle, you are considered a low…

    • 817 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Pdsa Cycle

    • 532 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Unfortunately Emergency Departments have little control over the amount and type of patients arriving in their hospitals. Many facilities are experiencing increased wait times and overflowing hallways with patients who have been admitted to the emergency department. These are increasingly troublesome issues that result from increased patient demand at a point in time when the number of emergency departments has declined and hospital inpatient capacity has decreased as well. This is why managing the flow of patients through their care is vital in preventing patient crowding, patient safety issues and quality of care.…

    • 532 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Nt1330 Unit 9 Final Paper

    • 1263 Words
    • 6 Pages

    With the help of process flow diagrams, compare the pre-triage and the post-triage systems in terms of total system time and total waiting times. Is the new system an improvement over the old?…

    • 1263 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    On the doctor’s side, less waiting time translates to more efficiency in the emergency department meaning more patients will be assessed. The fact that less time in the ER leas to better mood of the patient means that nurses will have an easier time in executing their duties as they are the frontline staff in the provision of care to the patients. Reducing waiting time is also of importance to the administration as it creates a positive light on the management of the hospital. Understanding some of the factors that immensely contribute to wait times in the emergency rooms is the initial step in addressing this problem. As such, the following paper critically examines, analyzes, and comes up with the strategic plans that can be implemented by Florida Hospital Orlando in a bid to reduce the wait time in the emergency…

    • 403 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Our theoretical model suggests that the length of stay for patients with critical illnesses are much more improved at teaching hospitals than in non-teaching hospitals. This metric is typically reported as an average since it assumes that all patients are equally ill. As a matter of fact, every patient is unique and may require specialized or advanced care and surgeries. The ability to predict length of stay can substantially improve a teaching hospital's capacity utilization, while ensuring that resources are available to meet the health care needs of the community (Omachonu VK) . Undoubtedly, teaching hospitals outrival the competition when it comes to treating the most critical patients. As healthcare costs increase each year, hospital officials and policymakers are highly motivated to search for ways to increase patient care and efficiency while continuing to find new innovative initiatives to keep costs…

    • 1198 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays