Human Rights Paper

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Human Rights Paper

One of the most undeniable and challenging foreign policy debates of the last several years has concerned the future of democracy and its role in human-rights law. The idea of Western societies encouraging democratization of non-western societies is believed to be cultural imperialism, which abuses the power of states in the developing world. However for the purpose of this paper, I view the support of democratization by Western societies as a positive approach to achieving the core significance of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights that is supposedly recognized by all states. The Universal Declaration of Human Rights was created on the notion of a common human race. It represents the first global expression of rights to which all human beings are naturally entitled. Of the fifty-eight countries that were members of the United Nations in 1948, forty-eight countries initially approved the document. Essentially all of the world’s states have approved it since then, which indicates that in any event its principle articles should be used by all states as an instrument in binding international law in spite of the presence of treaty ratification or state of war. Considering the fact that most countries have agreed to abide by the Declaration of Human Rights, it can be assumed that all states would have the intention to accomplish that in the best way possible. With the intentions of protecting essential human rights, the promotion of democratization is crucial and the most proficient way possible. The twenty second article of the Declaration of Human Rights states that: (1) Everyone has the right to take part in the government of his country, directly or through freely chosen representatives.
(2) Everyone has the right of equal access to public service in his country.
(3) The will of the people shall be the basis of the authority of government; this will shall be expressed in periodic and genuine elections which shall be by



Cited: "Democracy." U.S. Department of State. Web. 09 Dec. 2011. . [1] Diamond, Larry Jay., and Marc F. Plattner. Electoral Systems and Democracy. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins UP, 2006. Print. "FORA.tv - Is Democracy Globally Viable?" FORA.tv - Videos from the World 's Best Conferences and Events. Web. 09 Dec. 2011. . "Iraq War Wasn 't Justified, U.N. Weapons Experts Say - CNN." Featured Articles from CNN. 21 Mar. 2004. Web. 09 Dec. 2011. . Sen, Amartya. "Universal Truths: Human Rights and the Westernizing Illusion." Amartya Sen, "Universal Truths: Human Rights and the Westernizing Illusion," Harvard International Review, Vol. 20, No.3 (Summer, 1998), Pp. 40-43. Web. 9 Dec. 2011. . "United Nations Global Issues." Welcome to the United Nations: It 's Your World. Web. 09 Dec. 2011. . "WAR ON IRAQ - IS OIL A MOTIVE FOR THE MILITARY CONQUEST OF IRAQ? READ THE EVIDENCE AND DECIDE FOR YOURSELF." The Debate: Was Oil a Motive for the War on Iraq and Afghanistan? Did Oil Influence America 's Decision? Sign the Online Petition for a Public Statement from U.S. Government. TheDebate.org - Debating Current Affairs. Web. 09 Dec. 2011. . [2] Wright, Steven. The United States and Persian Gulf Security: The Foundations of the War on Terror, Ithaca Press, 2007 ISBN 978-0863723216.

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