Hong Kong

Powerful Essays
Global Business Cultural Analysis: Hong Kong
Dr. Maria Marin
Business 604

History
Hong Kong has been inhabited for millennia, with the early Che people settling the land early on. During the period of the Warring States in Mainland China, Yuet people immigrated from the north and forcibly assimilated the Che people. During the time of the Qin Dynasty Hong Kong was made a part of unified Imperial China.
Throughout the Han Dynasty in the 10th century the region grew in economic importance as a result of the local pearl industry. When the Mongols invaded China, Hong Kong saw a large influx of refugees from Mainland China, creating a population boom and further enlarging the already strong economy that had built around Hong Kong as a maritime trading port.
In the 19th century, Britain, faced with a growing trade deficit with China due to the British appetite for tea, expanded its sale of opium to China dramatically. The ruling Qing Dynasty disapproved, and banned the sale of opium. Britain pushed the issue by declaring war, and occupied Hong Kong Island by 1831.
The British would control Hong Kong until World War II. The Japanese seized the region briefly during World War II. Shortly after the war, the declaration of Communist China led to a new wave of refugees to British Hong Kong. As China continued to pursue an isolationist stance during the Communist era, Hong Kong became an important connection between the West and the mainland, and one of the only avenues for goods to come to and from China.
Hong Kong continued to develop as an economic center, phasing out industry and focusing on financial services and banking. In the 1980s, the British and Chinese negotiated a treaty whereby the entire region of Hong Kong, not just the area leased by the British, would be handed over to the Chinese in 1997. In return, the Chinese government would manage Hong Kong as a special administrative region, giving it a great deal of

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Good Essays

    Between the two wars Britain declared Hong Kong its own crown possession and in 1844 in forced the Manchu Dynasty to allow Christian missionaries into China. The acquisition of Hong Kong, although wrong, was used and is still being used by God as a gateway for freedoms, especially Christianity into China. Once the word got out that China was crumbling the European powers rushed to divide China into spheres of influence. These were not actual colonies (the Manchu government was still intact) but they were areas in which Europeans traded, invested and set up businesses.…

    • 1234 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Dbq on Silver Trade

    • 343 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Expansion of the Empire The Qing enjoyed a powerful military, which extended China’s boundaries, and the fruits of New World crops, which helped stimulate agricultural production. Commercialization spread as the population rose. Peasant handicrafts industries spread.…

    • 343 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Dbq Chinan Imperialism

    • 442 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Chinese civilizations were fundamentally altered by European imperialism because of China’s stubborn ways of not willing to trade with the West. Between the 1600s and the 1900s, China faced a terrible period of struggle. During 1644, the Manchus, which are from Mongolia, conquered China and started the Qing dynasty which began the series of struggle throughout China. While this was occurring China's population started to increase. In the late 1700s to the 1800s, China faced great internal strains due to an expanding population that they were unable to feed because they did not have a surplus of food. In addition to their food issues, China's government control began to weaken, making them an easier target to the rest of the West. But, China had no idea what they were in for.…

    • 442 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    9. The Opium War of 1839-1842 resulted in- opening China for increased trade with Great Britain…

    • 904 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    AAS notes

    • 1024 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Chines population rose from 2,716 in 1851 to 63,000 by 1871, 77% were located in California, with the rest scattered across the West, the South, and New England.…

    • 1024 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    European Colonies in Asia

    • 940 Words
    • 4 Pages

    In 1839, the confiscation by the Chinese authorities at Canton of 20,000 chests of opium led Britain to attack China in the First Opium War, and resulted in the seizure by Britain of Hong Kong Island, at that time a minor settlement.…

    • 940 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    Taiping Rebellion Dbq

    • 866 Words
    • 4 Pages

    During the three years of the Opium War, Great Britain destroyed much of China’s coastal and river forts. Under the pressure of the superior military tactics and firepower from Britain, the Qing dynasty finally surrendered to the British terms. As a result, China opened its five coastal ports to Britain, limited tariffs on British goods, covered the costs of the war, and gave extraterritorial rights to British citizens in the Treaty of Nanjing. Due to the increasing British’s presence in China, it concerned a few Chinese to adopt the foreign ways of the European civilization. In a way, the war opened China to the European influence, such that some Chinese even believed in transforming the Confucian civilization into more of a modernized European civilization.…

    • 866 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    China clung to its xenophobia and ultimately lost its independence. China sold tea to Britain but refused to buy British products. Consequently, Britain smuggled opium into China in order to balance trade between the two countries. The Chinese government became angered that opium addiction became rampant. China and Britain dealt with their disagreement and went to war about the addicts of opium. China lost the war and due to that fact of their lost they were over thrown and ruled by Britain. China was forced to trade due to the treaty of Nanjing, due to that treaty the Chinese were forced to accept opium and trade their tea to Britain.…

    • 492 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Imperialism Notes

    • 771 Words
    • 4 Pages

    * A war between Great Britain and China that began in 1839 as a conflict over the opium trade and ended in 1842. The Chinese gave up Hong Kong to the British and they Chinese also opened 5 of their ports to foreign merchants. Lastly they also granted other commercial and diplomatic privileges in the treaty of Nanjing.…

    • 771 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    In addition, along with Hong Kong after the 1980s and 1990s the economic take-off, a lot of fifty or sixty members of…

    • 622 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    The second dynasty, the loosely feudal Shang, definitely settled along the Yellow River in eastern China from the 18th to the 12th century BCE. They were invaded…

    • 1204 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    The opium wars between the western world and the Chinese empire was the spark to ignite the fury of the Chinese people. After the Asian forces lost the second war, the westerners made the Chinese sign a humiliating treaty, allowing opium to continue to flow into china, as well as surrendering the island of Hong Kong to the British Empire. Also seaports were opened to foreign powers (called treaty ports) in which there were concession areas which were actually ruled by foreigners. This meant that these were areas where the Chinese were foreigners in their own land.…

    • 737 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    The British were wrong by taking the option of trading opium because by trading opium, they would be jeopardising the wellbeing of an entire country. But they only did it because the Chinese were refusing to trade, so therefore it is only partially Britains fault.…

    • 799 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Best Essays

    Hong Kong has been chosen as the steppingstone into the vast Chinese market as most…

    • 2610 Words
    • 17 Pages
    Best Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Cultural self-analysis

    • 1495 Words
    • 6 Pages

    Coming from China and living in the United States, diversity and international relations have always been fascinating to me. In order to perceive dissimilar cultures well, I ought to be aware of myself and my own culture first; therefore, I would like to share a brief history of Hong Kong because I believe we would not know ourselves without knowing our history.…

    • 1495 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Powerful Essays