The evolution of democracy from Jefferson to Jackson

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Topics: Democracy, Mind
Abstract:Jefferson and Jackson both had prominent presidencies when in office. They both made their mistakes, but both made their essential marks on our nation. Through their contrasting views of political, social, and economic matters, they brought upon different aspects to the presidencies, but they were equally beneficial. Jefferson and Jackson also shared in some similar views when going about their terms as well. Through their similar and contrasting minds, they helped define true democracy, bringing it to what it is today.

Both Jackson and Jefferson contributed many beneficial factors towards their term as president, and to our country at the time and to this day. They both had the notion of building an equal nation; equal as Americans and the rights given to us as an American. Jackson had a somewhat fastidious attitude, but he was more of an open, lenient man who wanted to be surrounded by a peaceful atmosphere of people who he can not only trust, but who will listen to his every order. Jefferson was an equally demanding man who did what he thought was best, no matter how negative the opinions of others were. He hired who was best for the job, not necessarily who he was cool with, and he put down barriers to get what he thought needed to be done, done. Both were good respectable men, but their views of how not only the presidency should be, but how America should be differentiated from each other and also transformed as time went on.

Although Jefferson and Jackson had two completely ambivalent mindsets- Jefferson being influenced by the laws of enlightenment, and Jackson not being that way- their actions and thoughts throughout their presidency didnt necessarily deviate from one another at all times. As stated before, their minds were fixed around equality; an equal nation equals a strong nation. Unfortunately, considering the time period that we were in then, an equal nation was mainly centered on the men in this world. Therefore, women and even Natives



Cited: .(n.d.). Jefferson and jackson democracy. Retrieved from http://www.gatewaytomighistory.com/jefferson.jackson.ppt2.Boyer, P.S. (2004). The Enduring vision. boston: Houghton Mifflin Company. 3.(n.d.). American democracy. Retrieved from http://ap_history_online.tripod.com/apush10.htm

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