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Jacksonian Democracy DBQ

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Jacksonian Democracy DBQ
Jacksonian Democrats, followers of Andrew Jackson, protected democracy and the interests of the common man. They believed they were the guardians on the Constitution, and used it to protect states rights. Although there were some areas where they failed, they were strong supporters of the Constitution, expansion of political democracy, protection of individual liberty, and equality of economic opportunity. Jacksonian Democrats used the Constitution to protect the states and their local governments. Jackson defied the Supreme Court ruling concerning the Cherokee. Document G displays the result of Jackson’s tolerance towards the Native Americans. He wanted to remove all Native Americans east of the Mississippi to provide land for white …show more content…
Documents B and C discuss Jackson’s veto of the Bank of the US, and Webster’s response to it. Once Jackson issued the veto, he created “pet banks,” or state banks. Jackson then issued the Specie Circular, which required payment for purchases of public lands in gold or silver. The circular attempted to reduce the amount of paper money in circulation. The result partly contributed to the economic crisis of the time- the Panic of 1837, and Congress repealed the circular in 1838. Document H supports the rights of the community over monopolies, which incorporates the equality of economic opportunity. Concerning the Charles River Bridge dilemma, the decision made by Taney supported the rights of the community against monopolies, which Jacksonian Democrats supported in their efforts to maintain equal economic opportunity. Labor movements began to rise. George Evans wanted equal opportunity for the working class, as shown in Document A. The working class will suffer from decisions made by the government, and after time and time again of being abused, working class men want to reform the government and protect their right to equal economic opportunity. Under the Jackson administration, the working class was protected and given equal opportunity. The Jacksonian Democrats saw themselves as protectors of the Constitution. By following the Constitution, they would be protecting the people’s rights. They could expand political democracy. Economic opportunity would be more equal and fair to all. The Jackson administration did good for the United States, even though some decisions they made could be seen as hypocritical on what they believed. All in all, the country prospered in the end due to the Jacksonians’

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