Discuss research into the breakdown of romantic relationships (24 Marks)

Better Essays
Topics: Sex, Gender, Male, Female
One piece of research into the breakdown of romantic relationships is from Duck (1982). According to his phase model of the breakup of a relationship, it all begins with the breakdown of the relationship where there is dissatisfaction within the relationship. These dissatisfied partners then begin to consider all the problems within the relationship, thinking mostly about the relational ‘costs’ which develops a resentment for the relationship. This is known as the intra-psychic phase. Once a threshold of being unable to withstand the relationship anymore, the dissatisfied partner expresses their uncertainties about the relationship and so the dyadic phase has been reached and the couple will re-assess their goals, possibilities and commitment. If this is not successful, the social phase has been reached where the decision to leave the relationship is made and is publically discussed between third parties. Next, self-justifications and version-makings of the breakup are offered, which is known as the grave-dressing phase. Finally, the individuals will attempt to recreate a sense of their own social values, by preparing for different types of future relationships and knowing what they wish to get out of them, known as the resurrection process.
The evolutionary perspective on relationship breakdown is another explanation into the breakdown of romantic relationships. Perilloux and Buss (2008) have developed an explanation of why evolution might have shaped the behaviour of rejecters and rejectees differently. Their research is based on four main predictions. The first prediction is the costs related to emotional investment. In a relationship, women will consider the costs of losing the stability of a relationship whereas, if a male has high emotional investment in a relationship, he is more likely to share his resources. However, if the relationship breaks down, the male may leave his children unsupported. This highlights the importance of a males resources to the

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Good Essays

    Discuss research into the breakdown of romantic relationships (8 marks + 16 marks) Duck saw relationship breakdown as a process that occurs over time. He believed that a lack of interpersonal skills and lack of stimulation within the relationship causes the individual to get bored and feel that they are no longer progressing in their relationship which can cause strains and dissatisfaction. The first stage is intrapsychic; this is where a person feels under benefited in the relationship. The second…

    • 689 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Discuss research into the breakdown of romantic relationships (24) One approach to the breakdown of romantic relationships is a theory devised by Duck in 2001. Duck’s theory is a stage theory that covers both the reasons for breaking up and also the actual stages of dissolution. Pre-existing doom, mechanical failure and sudden death are the 3 main categories for why relationships break up. The first, pre-existing doom is where relationships are almost pre destined to fail due to incompatibility for…

    • 925 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Discuss one or more theories of the breakdown of romantic relationships. Duck argues that the causes for a breakdown in a relationship can be divided into two categories. This can be either predisposing factors which is partners being in close proximity which can expose behaviour that their partner may find distasteful or annoying. Also precipitating factors, these are factors that can get in the way of a relationship for example, long working hours, jealously, friends, family, opinions etc. Duck’s…

    • 773 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Discuss the influence of childhood on adult relationships. (24 Marks) Many attachment psychologists argue that early relationships with our primary caregivers provide the foundation for later adult relationships. Bowlby called this the continuity hypothesis. This is the claim that early relationship experiences continue in later adult relationships. According to the attachment theory, young children develop an 'internal working model' from their first relationship with their primary carer. This…

    • 821 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Discuss the influence of culture on romantic relationships Psychologists have found differences between western and non-western cultures in relationships. There are voluntary and non-voluntary relationships. Voluntary relationships are most common in western culture as you’d expect; due to urban settings and east geographical & social mobility, so interaction with others occurs on a much greater scale. Leading to a higher degree of choice of partners. In non-western cultures however it is found…

    • 1159 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    formation of romantic relationships (8+16 marks) The similarity theory by Byrne et al 1986 explains the formation of relationships. The essence of this view is that similarity promotes liking. Firstly, you will sort potential partners for dissimilarity, avoiding people who you perceive as a different personality type and attitudes to yourself. Then you chose someone who is most similar to yourself from the remaining. Couples with similar attitudes tend to have longer relationships and the theory…

    • 1066 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Psychology Essay A2 Psychology Discuss Two Theories of The Breakdown of Relationships Rolle & Ducks, 2006 model of breakdown endeavorers to explain the procedures in 6 solid steps. Its begins with dissatisfaction with how ones relationship is carried out, one partner senses that something is immoral/not right , which leads to an intrapsychic process that is characterised by brooding the partners faults and the demerits, in other words cost of their relationship. In the dyadic process the partners…

    • 937 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Romantic Relationships

    • 36596 Words
    • 147 Pages

    Relational Standards: Rules and Expectations in Romantic Relationships Submitted by Alexandra Elizabeth West BBSc, BLitt, Postgrad Dip in Psychology June 2006 A thesis submitted in fulfillment of the requirements of the degree of Doctor of Philosophy of Australian Catholic University National. School of Psychology Australian Catholic University National Melbourne, Australia Australian Catholic University Research Services Locked Bag 4115 Fitzroy, Victoria 3065 Australia Acknowledgements…

    • 36596 Words
    • 147 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    Romantic Relationships

    • 1077 Words
    • 5 Pages

    choice is romantic relationships; I would firstly like to define a romantic relationship. A romantic relationship is “one where you have a deep feeling of connection to the other person, it is a relationship based on love, passion and commitment to another person”(Website 1). The reason I chose romantic relationships would be due to the fact that these relationships are social phenomena that have existed from the beginning of time and will continue to exist as long as humans exist. Relationships are an…

    • 1077 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Romantic Relationships

    • 1445 Words
    • 6 Pages

    Romantic Relationships It is said that love is the most profound emotion known to human beings. Every day people fall in love, commit into relationships and fall out of them. Romantic relationships are one of the most unique types of interpersonal relationships, they 're different from any other. Love can be the most amazing feeling, but it can also being the most heart break. Learning how to manage a romantic relationship is key if you plan to maintain a healthy one. Interpersonal communication…

    • 1445 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Better Essays