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Critical analysis of affected of economic crisis on the luxury brand market

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Critical analysis of affected of economic crisis on the luxury brand market
Abstract
This thesis going analysis and critique characteristic of the luxury market and especially the clothing sector.
The Author will realize research to understand the changes established by luxury brands during this period of economic crisis Fiscal. The economic crisis currently affecting all sectors, the objectives will be to understand the extent of the result of the luxury market but also the different techniques used to overcome this period.
The Author makes a secondary data collection through books and newspapers articles, but also with numerous website of the world of luxury in order to obtain the most accurate information.

Table of content
I- Introduction………………………………………….…………………6
1.1 Rational………………………………………………………..………..…………..7
1.2 Aims and objectives……………………………………….……...………………...8
1.3 Research questions……………………………………………..……………....…..8
1.4 Theoretical framework…………………………………………………………...10
II- Methodology………………………………….………………………11
2.1 Choice of research………………………………………..……………………….12
2.2 Construction of design……………………………………………………………13
2.3 Scope of research………………………………………………….………………15
III- Literature Review…………………………………….……………..16
3.1 What is luxury?........................................................................................................17 3.1.1 Definition……………………………………………….………………..17 3.1.2 Relativity………………………………………………..………………..18 3.1.2.1 Economic relativity……………………………………………19 3.1.2.2 Cultural relativity……………………………………………..19 3.1.2.3 Regional relativity……………………………………………..20 3.1.2.4 Temporal relativity……………………..……………………..21
3.2 Luxury customer………………………………………………...………………..22 3.2.1 Customer behaviour…………………………………………………….23 3.2.1.1 The Veblen effect…………………………..…………………..24
3.2.1.2 The Snob effect……………………………..………………….25 3.2.1.3 The Bandwagon effect…………………………...……………26 3.2.2 Price………………………………………………………...……………26 3.2.3 Exclusivity



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