Buddhism and Buddhist Meditation

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Buddhist Meditation

• Buddhism is divided into a number of different traditions including Theravada and Mahayana. A key component of the Buddhist religion is meditation.
Buddhists meditate because it helps them to understand Buddha’s teaching.

The key beliefs in Buddhism are the four noble truths –
1. All of life is marked by suffering
2. Suffering is caused by desire and attachment
3. Suffering can be eliminated
4. Suffering is eliminated by following the Noble Eightfold path
All of life is about suffering; suffering is caused by a desire to have possessions. Suffering can be eliminated and this can be done by following the noble eightfold path.
This eightfold path describes the way in which people should live their lives. That is to have the right understanding, thoughts, speech, actions, livelihood, effort, mindfulness and concentration.

• Buddhist meditation is a form of mental concentration to change how the mind works, which leads ultimately to enlightenment and spiritual freedom. The basic purpose of tranquillity meditation is to still the mind and train it to concentrate. The object of concentration is less important than the skill of concentration itself, some people chose to concentrate on breathing, devices (like colour or light), recollections (such as sayings of the Buddha) and virtues (like loving-kindness).

• Meditation is important in Buddhist religion as through meditation the Buddha was able to clear his mind and see the truth in existence and suffering. This meditation helped the Buddha reach enlightenment. Buddhists aim to achieve this enlightenment. Meditation is a way of becoming calm and positive. Meditating requires deep concentration to clear the mind. You can do this if you lead a good life and follow the Eightfold path.

• There are many different types of Buddhist meditation. Tranquillity or concentration (samatha Bhavana) is to still the mind and train it to concentrate. The object of concentration is less

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