top-rated free essay

Araby

By mzozo740 Jul 18, 2013 1039 Words
Many reasons could have a big impact on our actions as human beings. Some principles could affect our actions in a bad or a good way. Age and experience play a big role on how we think and how we can make our decisions. Sometimes we make decisions based on our emotions. In ''Araby'' by James Joyce, the main character was a boy that lives with his aunt and his uncle. The boy made a decision that taught him a big lesson. The young boy realized that he was a fool after going far away from home for a girl.

First of all, the narrator is an unnamed boy that lives in North Dublin street . The boy explains how their street evoked images of a vacuous, joyless, and stagnant environment: '' An uninhabited house of two stories stood at the blind end, detached from its neighbors in a square ground'' ( Araby F-JO1-1 ). The boy feels very emotionless about where he lives, and how his neighborhood appears. He doesn’t find any excitement in it. The house in which the young boy lives seems equally cold and gray: "Air, musty from having long been enclosed, hung in all the rooms, and the waste room behind the kitchen was littered with old and useless papers'' ( Araby F-JO1-1). The narrator seemed to dislike the environment that he lived in. Also, he was thinking about the priest who died in the house before his family moved in which made the situation worst for the boy: '' The former tenant of our house, a priest died in the back drawing-room'' ( Araby F-JO1-1 ). The narrator introduced us to his crush. She was the sister of his friend, she was always in the narrator's thoughts. He was thinking about her when he eats, drinks, and sits in the back room of his house alone. He says, “Her dress swung as she moved her body and the soft rope of her hair tossed from side to side” ( Araby F-JO1-1). She was making him happy, and what makes his beat, yet none of it can possibly be more than a crush. The boy was stalking her every day. In the story we see the narrator admitting that he was waiting for the girl to come outside when he said: '' she came out on the doorstep my heart leaped. I ran to the hall, seized my books, and followed her'' (Araby F-JO1-1). The narrator’s infatuation is so intense that he fears he will never gather the courage to speak with the girl and express his feelings. When she finally speaks to him, he gets flustered and excited. She asked him if he was going to a Bazaar called '' Araby '', he told her that he would bring her a gift when he goes to Araby.

Next, the narrator decides to go to Araby for the young girl. The narrator was so happy that he wanted to go to Araby and bring something for his crush. That meant she was special to his heart and he would do anything to make their relationship stronger: '' “What innumerable follies laid waste my waking and sleeping thoughts after that evening! I wished to annihilate the tedious intervening days'' ( Araby F-JO1-2 ). The narrator told his uncle that he wanted to go to the bizaar and asked him if he could take him there. At the night of Araby, his uncle was late. After it passes 8 at night. His uncle gets home and told him that he forgot about Araby: ''At nine O'clock I heard my uncle's latchkey in the halldoor'' ( Araby F-JO1-3 ). The boy felt that he could do anything for that girl, even though if it was late at night. The boy left to Araby and he finally arrives at the building which contains the '' magical name'' (Araby F-JO1-3 ). The boy walked in into the bazaar and everything was shutdown. he is quickly hit with the realization that maybe he shouldn’t have gone. He notes, “Nearly all the stalls were closed and the greater part of the hall was in darkness. I recognized a silence like that which pervades a church after a service” (Araby F-JO1-3 ). This is when we see the narrator's happiness crushed into sadness.. When the bazaar shut down, the narrator realized that his friend's sister will fail his expectations,

and that his desire for her is actually only a vain wish for change. The narrator’s change of heart concludes the story on a moment of epiphany. Instead of reaffirming his love or realizing that he does not need gifts to express his feelings for Mangan’s sister, the narrator simply gives up. He seems to interpret his arrival at the bazaar as it fades into darkness as a sign that his relationship with Mangan’s sister will also remain just a wishful idea and that his infatuation was as misguided as his fantasies about the bazaar.

In conclusion, the narrator is just a foolish boy who fell in love with a girl that he barely knew. The story begins with a description of the setting. The boy feels very emotionless about where he lives, and how his neighborhood appears. The young boy fell in love with the sister of his friend, Mangan. He stalked her and watched her house every day. The story contains many important moments in which the boy shows the reader the type of person he is. the boy notices the horrible view he has on his journey, and quickly remembers why he is going to this bazaar. He knew to experience something new, but does he want something new, or is he going because of the sister that told him about the bazaar. It is clear that the boy wanted to go to make a better relationship and please the girl. After arriving at the closed bazaar, the narrator realized that his personal vanity, or the personal pride he thought he would obtain by coming to the bazaar, was ultimately something he couldn’t obtain. He thought coming to Araby would help him find something for the girl, which would help him get her as a friend, and maybe something more.

Cite This Document

Related Documents

  • Araby: an Outline Commentary

    ...Araby: An Outline Commentary ‘The Sisters’ and ‘An Encounter’ are about the same length. ‘Araby’ is roughly a hundred lines shorter than these. There is a progression in the three stories. The boy in ‘The Sisters’ is a passive witness, limited in his capacity to act by the weight of the adults about him. The boy of ‘An Enco...

    Read More
  • araby

    ...Analysis In “Araby,” the allure of new love and distant places mingles with the familiarity of everyday drudgery, with frustrating consequences. Mangan’s sister embodies this mingling, since she is part of the familiar surroundings of the narrator’s street as well as the exotic promise of the bazaar. She is a “brown figure” who b...

    Read More
  • Araby

    ...Araby Notes and Questions "Araby" "Araby," like much of Joyce’s work, is a fictionalized, autobiographical story. On May 14,1894, a five-day charity bazaar called Araby opened in Dublin. The name alludes to Arabia where open-air shops and rows of peddler carts lined the streets in an exciting cacophony. For children living in Dubl...

    Read More
  • Araby

    ... LeBla George Gibson English 102 11 November 2013 The Road to Araby James Joyce’s “Araby” is a short story of a nameless boy in Dublin who has a typical crush on...

    Read More
  • Araby

    ... Amber Bray Professor Boisson ENGL-200-D26 03 November 2013 In the short story “Araby” an unnamed boy describes mostly his thoughts and experiences in a North Dublin street. The allure of a new love and wonderful places mingles with his familiarity to hardships. The boy truly believes that the key to impressing Mangan’s sister i...

    Read More
  • Araby

    ...*Analysis of “Araby*” by James Joyce The tone of “Araby” significantly contributes to the main character’s eventual self-discovery. The author uses tone in the beginning of the story to show the intensity of the main character’s feelings for a girl. The author uses phrases such as “we watched her”, “her dress swung as she move...

    Read More
  • araby

    ... “Araby” Love, adolescence, foolishness, and maturity are the words that describe James Joyce’s short story “Araby”. The narrator is a young boy living with his aunt and uncle in a dark, untidy, poor home in Dublin. During this time, this young character is facing something that opened the passage from childhood to adolescence, t...

    Read More
  • araby

    ...James Joyce's "ARABY" Joyce reportedly boasted that Ulysses would keep the professors busy, and indeed it has occupied the bulk of articles pertaining to his work. Dubliners is often seen as a step to that great work, and its stories are often picked over for evidence of their influence on Ulysses. However, a number of tales in this collecti...

    Read More

Discover the Best Free Essays on StudyMode

Conquer writer's block once and for all.

High Quality Essays

Our library contains thousands of carefully selected free research papers and essays.

Popular Topics

No matter the topic you're researching, chances are we have it covered.