Analysing Observation in Social Work

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Contents Page

1. Family Details 3 2. Observation Analysis 4 3. Life Span Development 7 4. Sociology 10 5. Social Policy 13 6. References 16 7. Appendices 21 i) Recording Observation 21 ii) Community Profile 28 iii) Consent form 45

Family Details

This observation is based on a family consisting of a young professional married couple and their three year old daughter. I observed them for one hour over three weeks, in the evening to fit into their schedules. They have lived in the borough of Croydon in their three bedroom house for six years. For the purpose of this assignment all the names have been changed and the family have given their consent to the observations.

(Sonia Morris) Mum – teacher for a local primary school, original from Leeds

(Paige Morris) Toddler – 3 years old girl, she goes to the local nursery attached to the school Sonia works in.

(Lewis Morris) Father – ICT consultant

Genogram

Observation Analysis

Using observational methods are helpful in describing individual’s behaviour as they interact in real time; and allow the reader to create a verbal picture of the behaviours as they unfold. This is important when social workers are working with children and families in their home (Pellegrini, 1996:1), and there is a growing recognition in social work literature around observation in practice (Riche & Tanner, 1998:17). On my first observation I was not nervous but did feel intrusive about entering the Morris’s home, I had meet them a few days before and they were very welcoming which eased some of the anxieties I had. I know that as a qualified social worker on some occasions (e.g. child protection) I will be meeting the family for the first time when conducting a home visit and they might not be welcoming. Taking the role of observer is what I was most apprehensive about, I was unsure of what to expect on



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Wilson, Kate(1992) 'The place of child observation in social work training ', Journal of Social Work Practice, 6: 1, 37-47.

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