Zeros

Topics: Bond, Zero-coupon bond, Yield Pages: 8 (3607 words) Published: October 26, 2014
Fixed Income 

Zero coupon bonds 

Professor Anh Le 

1 – Zero coupon bond and zero yields 
A zero coupon bond (or zero for short), as its name suggests, is a bond that pays no coupons. It only  pays the face value on the maturity date. Not surprisingly, sellers of zero coupon bonds have to offer  them at a deep discount in order to sell them to the public. For example, a 30‐yr zero, face value $1,000  could be selling for as little as $53.54. 

One question you may ask right now is: if you only get back the face value on the maturity date and no  coupons between now and then, isn’t it weird since you don’t earn any interest?  The answer is: every bond earns interest and zeros are no exception. Let’s think about it this way.  Instead of buying the above 30‐yr zero, you put $53.54 in a bank account that pays an interest rate of  10% p.a. semi‐annually compounding – how much would you end up after 30 years? By now, you should  be quite proficient with this: 10% semi‐annually compounding really means 5% per six months,  therefore, after 30 years, $53.54 would grow to $53.54(1.0560) =  $1,000.  So, the interest rate that you earn from a 30‐yr zero is implicit in the discount that you receive. From our  calculations above, a 30‐year zero face value $1,000 selling for $53.54 is implicitly offering you a rate of  interest of 10% p.a. semi‐annual compounding. This rate of interest rate has a name. It is called zero  yield. Knowing about the zero yield for a maturity is very useful because we can price zero for that  corresponding maturity. In the above example, the zero yield for the 30‐year maturity is 10%p.a.,  therefore, the price for the 30‐yr zero, face value $1000, must be $1000/1.0560 = $53.54. Should the 30‐ yr zero yield be 5%, the price of the 30‐yr zero must be $1000/1.02560 = $227.28.  In short, zero yields are the interest rates that we earn on zeros AND we can use such zero yields to  price zeros of the corresponding maturities. 

2 – The zero yield curve 
It is common understanding that when you lend your money for a short period, you will get a lower rate  of interest than when you lend money for a longer period of time. The rate that you will get from your  term deposits tends to be higher than what banks pay on your money market savings account.   Likewise, if bond sellers issue a 1‐year zero, the public will generally require a lower interest rate/zero  yield than if they issue a 10‐year zero. Here is an example of the borrowing rates for different  maturities: 

Maturities 

0.5 



1.5 



2.5 



3.5 



4.5 



Yields   

3.00%  3.60%  4.20%  4.70%  5.20%  5.60%  6.00%  6.30%  6.50%  6.60% 

Often, people (myself included) don’t like tables and they would put the numbers above into a graph  like the one below where the x‐axis corresponds to maturities and the y‐axis corresponds to interest  rates or yields.  This curve is called the zero yield curve. It is also called the term structure of interest  rates.  

Fixed Income 

Zero coupon bonds 

Professor Anh Le 

Zero yield curve
7.00%
6.00%
5.00%
4.00%
3.00%
2.00%
1.00%
0.00%
0

1

2

3

4

5

6

 
Historically speaking, the zero yield curve can take quite a variety of shapes. The most common shape is  upward sloping as in the graph above. However, there have been times when we had hump‐shaped  yield curves where interest rates are highest for medium maturities and low for very short and very long  maturities. More recently, we have an interesting situation where the yield curve is inverted. Effectively,  lending long will earn a lower rate of interest than lending short! How strange! I often wonder how  banks can survive with an inverted yield curve. If they are in the business of borrowing short and lending  long, doesn’t it mean that their borrowing cost is higher than their interest revenues? More ...
Continue Reading

Please join StudyMode to read the full document

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • History of Zero Essay
  • Plus Minus Zero. Advertising Strategy Essay
  • Zero Tolerance Essay
  • Absolute Zero Essay
  • Zero Tolerance Essay
  • Essay on Zero Tolerance
  • Agrument on Zero-Tolerance Policy Essay
  • Zero in Mathematics Essay

Become a StudyMode Member

Sign Up - It's Free