Theory of Spontaneous Origin and Biogenesis

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INTRODUCTION

Robert. C. Gallagher once said: “Change is inevitable- except from a vending machine.”
“Change” is the word the practically governs our world today. Everything is slowly and gradually changing, new technologies and opportunities boosting everywhere. But the underlying question which we all wishfully choose to ignore is “All the changes happening is for good only?”
Ellen Glasgow once said: “All change is not growth, as all movement is not forward.”
Such are the changes going on in the world which are definitely not for good. They are changes like floods, famines, earthquakes and many more natural disasters. Now it feels as though our Mother Earth is mocking at us and trying to teach us an important lesson as though how does it feel if we were tortured. If we were inflicted upon pain the same way we did to her. In all one thought does occur to all of us that is the world really ending? Are we going back to where it all started?

But one more question is to be asked and it is WHERE did all this start? WHERE did earth come from? HOW did the life originate? HOW did we come to life?

Some of the truth and myths of this “ORIGIN OF LIFE” Is further discussed in this project.

Theory of spontaneous origin

Introduction
Charles Darwin's theory of evolution on the origin of life proposes that some four billion years ago, inanimate chemicals developed completely by chance into highly complex, living, single-celled organisms. This process of life coming from non-life is called "spontaneous generation." According to the theory, a single-celled organism eventually evolved into all the complex life forms on earth in a relentless struggle for resources. Every evolutionary theory of life’s origins is based on spontaneous generation.

The evolutionary development of life on earth is commonly depicted as an "evolutionary tree." If life did arise spontaneously and then evolve into increasingly complex life forms, then spontaneous generation represents

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