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The Pros And Cons Of Eugenics

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The Pros And Cons Of Eugenics
Eugenics has brought the idea that each person has value. The value of each person is similar to a certificate that gives you privileges over everyone who did not fit the idea of the super-race. “Eugenicists trumpeted reproduction as a means to preserve the Anglo-Saxon race, and, in turn, believed that the failure of eugenically fit women to reproduce would lead to the race’s demise”. (Ziegler, 2008) Women had to be checked by “scientists” to see if they would be classified as fit for companionship/marriage. The standards for a fit-women were she should be barred from pursuing higher education, professionalization, and employment in favor of occupying themselves solely with having children. Eugenicists contended that women should only be “educated” …show more content…
The idea of eugenics for women is to make their bodies into lifeless, soulless, and docile. They become docile bodies because they are subjected, used, transformed and improved. The bodies are then improved by trying to pick and choose what qualities they would like to pass on to the future generations. The future generations are now losing individuality because everyone is looking the same. People are looking the same because eugenics has elements of Darwinism in its philosophy. The elements they take from Darwinism are getting rid of the weak by eliminating them. The idea of genetics puzzles people because it presents itself as genocide. The genocide is performed the same way as who was chosen as the Aryan (Certificate) during the Holocaust. People were allowed to live and reproduce certificates that would produce people who were “fit”. The “certificates” hold so much privilege that make everyone want to do dangerous damage that would prevent “unfit” people from being born. Sterilization played a huge role to prevent “unfit” people from being born. Women were sterilized to prevent “unfit” offspring. Sterilization was seen as an essential idea that it would make the world a better …show more content…
“California defined sterilization not as a punishment but as a prophylactic measure that could simultaneously defend the public health, preserve precious fiscal resources, and mitigate the menace of the “unfit” and “feebleminded”. (Stern, 2005) California was one of the major states to approve of sterilizing the unfit people, but mainly Latina women. Human population control was seen as a problem in California because many undocumented women and women in general were conceiving babies. California did not like the idea of having babies produced by women who were undocumented. “"I don't remember signing the consent form," said Hermosillo, now 66. "They decided for me."” (Tajima-Peña, No Mas Bebes) Women having their right to bare children taken away because of a terrible family program initiated by the government shows that people do not take the lives of women seriously. The feeling to not be able to produce children anymore is devastating because she loses a freedom that should not be taken from her without consent. Putting myself into the shoes of the female must be heartbreaking. Having anyone close to me that I have taken care of is painful because you raised/spent time on the person. Giving a person your life and time shows that having the privilege to produce children should be consent act, but in the eyes of the government it is not. The government lied to us that they would protect us from harm, but you

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