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The Church Of England Was Only A Half R

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The Church Of England Was Only A Half R
Jessica Annobil

Mrs Harris

“The Church of England was only a half reformed church in the period 1559-1603”. To what extent is this statement valid? (45marks)
This statement is valid to a considerable extent. This is due to the fact that before Elizabeth came to the throne her siblings had been before her, Edward VI (1547-53) and Mary I (1553-59), these two had a contrasting religious beliefs and both implemented harsh penalties for those who did not conform to their religious reform. This is one aspect of the Mid-Tudor crisis which then creates a problem for Elizabeth in enforcing religion successfully as Parliament now consisted of both
Catholics and Protestants. It is for this reason that some may consider the Church of England to be half reformed. This essay will seek to prove that the statement is valid.
In Elizabeth’s early years she adopted a cautious approach. She knew she had to implement a line of religion but, as said previously, she was the successor of two contrasting monarchs in terms of religion and she had to be careful as to how she was to implement her Protestant ideals without aggravating the Catholics, she wanted to appease. Elizabethan Religious Settlement was a clear indication of the direction in which Elizabeth was going. In 1559 Elizabeth passes the Act of
Supremacy. The Act revived 10 acts which Mary had reverted, significantly clarified and narrowed the meaning of what constituted heresy, and confirmed Elizabeth as Supreme Governor of the
Church of England. The title Supreme Governor was a title that made Elizabeth head of the Church without ever saying she was. This was important because many felt that a woman could not rule the church, also because this implies sovereignty over the church which should enable her to fully reform the church. The Act of Supremacy was also aimed at abolishing the authority of the Pope in
England, which was a vague cut from Rome, without Elizabeth obviously severing ties. The Act of
Uniformity, also in

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