The Changing Roles of Women of Sweden

Powerful Essays
Topics: Marriage, Family
Introduction Sweden has developed a modern industrial culture based on natural resources, technical skills, and a sense of quality. Simplicity and even severity resulting from geographic and economic conditions characterize Swedish society and life.
The title suggests that there have been changes in the roles of the Swedish woman. There is no doubt that this is the case. The degree to which and the speed with which changes have occurred, however, are somewhat more difficult to evaluate. At the same time, if women's roles change, men's roles should change too, especially if women's new roles begin to invade areas previously held by the men. We can, therefore conclude that changes in one role bring about changes in other roles. Not only are changes in women and men's roles of importance but also changes in girls' and boys' roles. Through observation and experience, attempts to change adult roles have often been premised on changes in the roles of children and adolescents.
In this paper, some data related to gender roles in the family, both children's gender roles and the gender roles of the adult members of a family will be presented. Some examples of child rearing, division of labor between the spouses, and of gender roles in relation to cohabitation and marriage will also be included. This data will allude to evidence of changes in female employment rates, fertility rates as well as some important information on governmental policies in Sweden.

Cohabitation Sweden is a worldly society with open-minded norms concerning the way men and women choose to live together. The choice between a formal marriage and informal cohabitation has long since been an essentially private matter. There is no set way to any particular family form, and not even Swedish family law (last revised in 1987) is confined to married couples. The law treats unmarried and married couples equally in most aspects. For instance, no distinction is made between married and unmarried



References: Hoem, Britta. (1995) The New Role of Women: Sweden. Colorado: Westview Press Inc. Microsoft Encarta Encyclopedia. (1999). Sweden. Redmond, WA: Microsoft Corporation. Trost, Jan, (1983) The Changing Position of Women in Family and Society: Sweden. (Vol (1995)." http://www.wisc.edu/uwcc/icic/orgs/ica/pubs/ica-news/1995/4/folksam.html

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Good Essays

    Changing Roles of Women

    • 1199 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Nowadays it’s a little different most women are employed full-time and have to come home to clean and cook for their families. Unfortunately, things are almost exactly the same the if not harder for women because now they not only have to cook and clean, but they also have to work. Dave Barry, the author of the essay “The Ugly Truth about Beauty”, in the text Mirror on America believes women are too concerned with the way they look. He implies that women are never satisfied with their look,…

    • 1199 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Women Changing Roles

    • 1487 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Women Changing Role’s in the 1920’s During the 1920’s women had began to change their roles in society to show that they can be more than what they appeared. Before the 1920’s women were second class citizens that came second in society, they did not have the same privileges as men did. Many women also did not have jobs which contributed to society because women were busy at home taking care of children and the house. Also the expectations of men were to be the supporters of the family which made…

    • 1487 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Changing Role of Women

    • 439 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Women were greatly affected by the changing society after 1815. Not only did their status change in the family, but outside of the home as well. Opportunities evolved for them in the work place, and society. They began to work in factories, and this change brought economic independence for women. Many of the women that began to work were single. When they finally did get married, they would quit their job in the factories, and go on to work at home being a full time mother and wife. At home they…

    • 439 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Changing Role of Women

    • 918 Words
    • 4 Pages

    biological phenomenon, gender is a social construct, defined by societal norms that attribute different roles and values to men and women. Moreover, these sex-specific roles, rights, and obligations are not just different, they also tend to be unequal (Kishor, 1999). Unequal gender relations -- existing to varying degrees in most if not all countries of the world-- feed directly into the status accorded to women and girls in society. Women's status is a term that describes women's situation in both absolute…

    • 918 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    "new woman." Significant changes for women took place in politics, at home, in workplace, and in education. POLITICAL CHANGE: Many women believed that it was their right and duty to take a serious part in politics. When passed in 1920, the Nineteenth Amendment gave women the right to vote but surprisingly, some women didn't want the vote. A widespread attitude was that women's roles and men's roles did not overlap, this idea of "separate spheres" held that women should concern themselves with home…

    • 800 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Changing Roles Of Men and Women 1950s In the years that followed the second world war, a golden age in history was set out. There was a surge in business, and after mourning their lost ones, people had grown to accept this new life. However, this new age also led to the social hierarchy, placing men at the top and their women at their feet. Men at the time were more than likely soldiers, adjusting to peace time once more. For most men, the idea was that they would start a family, get…

    • 3609 Words
    • 10 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    The Changing Role of Women in India Women in India are beginning to follow the direction that the women of the Western world took more than eighty years ago; demanding treatment as human equals. However, it has become more and more evident as the revolution ages that Indian women may have to adapt the Western feminist method to their very traditional and religious culture. India has different complications that put the development of women in a completely altered context than their Western counterparts…

    • 314 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    For millennia, women have left their mark on the world, at times changing the course of history and at other times influencing small but significant spheres of life. Only in the past century, however, have concerted efforts been made to represent women's contributions more fully in history books. Consequently, changes in status for many women in modern times—the right to own property, to vote, and to choose their own careers—may obscure the accomplishments made by women of earlier eras. In selecting…

    • 450 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    myself what I want for other women, absolute equality. After that is secured, then men and women can take turns at being angels." - Agnes Macphail The 20th century has been a period of rapid and far-reaching change for many women but life for women in some parts of the world still remains harsh. Even where females have experienced great advances like those in Canada, there are still some similarities between their economic role today and the role of women in the 1900s. During the 19th…

    • 3143 Words
    • 13 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Best Essays

    Changing Role of Women in Society How was the status of woman and their rights represented in western society in the 1600 to early 20th century? For centuries, woman and their rights have been oppressed by the dominance of man. There has been continued struggle for the recognition of woman’s cultural roles and achievements, and for their social and political rights. It was very much a patriarchal society for woman, which hindered or prevented woman from realizing their productive and creative possibilities…

    • 3199 Words
    • 13 Pages
    Best Essays