The Amish Culture

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Topics: Amish
Along the southern Rhine River and in Switzerland, a small group of reform-minded Mennonites began called, The Amish. Their simplicity lifestyle, ways of living and unique beliefs set them apart from other cultures. Evolving agriculturalists cultivating soil, producing crops, raising and hording livestock, classifying the Amish as Horticulturalists, is their identified primary way of subsistence. We, as Americans, primarily buy foods and handmade products from The Amish. As customers, it’s vital to know about The Amish way of living, traditions, and how they withstand in today’s society.
Founder, Jacob Anman (1664-1720), is where the name of the Amish comes from. “He was an obscure reformer about whom little is known (Robinson, 2009).” Anman felt the Mennonites strayed away from the original beliefs and practices. As a result, Anman wanted them to return to a stricter adherence of the writings of Simons and on the 1632 Mennonite Dordrecht Confession (Robinson, 2009). The split with the Mennonites was due to the frequency of communion, practice of foot washing and process of shunning of non-conforming members. Anman felt communion would aid to membership and diligence in Christian life if advocated communion twice a year, every 6 months. Anman reintroduced foot washing, as it had phases out of use by most Mennonite groups. Anman also felt Mennonites were too lax and had allowed the process of shunning of non-conforming members to fall into disuse. Anman treated shunning very seriously and took it a step further requiring the spouse of a person under the ban to neither sleep nor eat with the sinner, until behavior or beliefs were repented and changed (Robinson, 2009). “Hans Reist, a leader of the main Mennonite body, argued that Jesus had socialized with known sinners and had kept himself pure; he reasoned that Christians in the late 17th century could do the same without resorting to shunning (Robinson, 2009).”
Their spiritual beliefs and family



References: Good, Merle. (1985). Who Are The Amish? Intercouse, PA: Good Books Israel, Fred L. (1996). The Amish. New York, NY. Nolt, Steven. "A history of the Amish," Good Books, (1992), Pages 228 to 233. Nowak, B., & Laird, P. (2010). Cultural Anthropology. San Diego, CA: Bridgepoint Education. Robinson, B.A. (2006) “Beliefs of the Amish.” Retrieved from http://www.religioustolerance.org/amish3.htm Robinson, B.A. (2009). “The Amish. The Early Years in Europe: How the Protestant Reformation generated the Free Church movement, when led to the Mennonite movement from which the Amish split.” Retrieved from http://www.religioustolerance.org/amish1.htm Seitz, Blair., Hoover, Ruth. (1991). Amish Ways. Harrisburg, PA "The Amish American Experience American Experience." PBS, United States. 2012. Television.

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