Preview

The Amish Culture

Powerful Essays
Open Document
Open Document
1252 Words
Grammar
Grammar
Plagiarism
Plagiarism
Writing
Writing
Score
Score
The Amish Culture
Along the southern Rhine River and in Switzerland, a small group of reform-minded Mennonites began called, The Amish. Their simplicity lifestyle, ways of living and unique beliefs set them apart from other cultures. Evolving agriculturalists cultivating soil, producing crops, raising and hording livestock, classifying the Amish as Horticulturalists, is their identified primary way of subsistence. We, as Americans, primarily buy foods and handmade products from The Amish. As customers, it’s vital to know about The Amish way of living, traditions, and how they withstand in today’s society.
Founder, Jacob Anman (1664-1720), is where the name of the Amish comes from. “He was an obscure reformer about whom little is known (Robinson, 2009).” Anman felt the Mennonites strayed away from the original beliefs and practices. As a result, Anman wanted them to return to a stricter adherence of the writings of Simons and on the 1632 Mennonite Dordrecht Confession (Robinson, 2009). The split with the Mennonites was due to the frequency of communion, practice of foot washing and process of shunning of non-conforming members. Anman felt communion would aid to membership and diligence in Christian life if advocated communion twice a year, every 6 months. Anman reintroduced foot washing, as it had phases out of use by most Mennonite groups. Anman also felt Mennonites were too lax and had allowed the process of shunning of non-conforming members to fall into disuse. Anman treated shunning very seriously and took it a step further requiring the spouse of a person under the ban to neither sleep nor eat with the sinner, until behavior or beliefs were repented and changed (Robinson, 2009). “Hans Reist, a leader of the main Mennonite body, argued that Jesus had socialized with known sinners and had kept himself pure; he reasoned that Christians in the late 17th century could do the same without resorting to shunning (Robinson, 2009).”
Their spiritual beliefs and family



References: Good, Merle. (1985). Who Are The Amish? Intercouse, PA: Good Books Israel, Fred L. (1996). The Amish. New York, NY. Nolt, Steven. "A history of the Amish," Good Books, (1992), Pages 228 to 233. Nowak, B., & Laird, P. (2010). Cultural Anthropology. San Diego, CA: Bridgepoint Education. Robinson, B.A. (2006) “Beliefs of the Amish.” Retrieved from http://www.religioustolerance.org/amish3.htm Robinson, B.A. (2009). “The Amish. The Early Years in Europe: How the Protestant Reformation generated the Free Church movement, when led to the Mennonite movement from which the Amish split.” Retrieved from http://www.religioustolerance.org/amish1.htm Seitz, Blair., Hoover, Ruth. (1991). Amish Ways. Harrisburg, PA "The Amish American Experience American Experience." PBS, United States. 2012. Television.

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Better Essays

    Amish vs Aussie

    • 1043 Words
    • 5 Pages

    The Amish are a group of traditionalist, anti-modernist, protestant religious followers. Founded by Jakob Ammann, in 1690 when him, and his followers broke away from being Mennonites in Europe and immigrated to the united stated, were there communities have thrived for over 300 years and going strong.…

    • 1043 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    How does peter weir portrayal of the relationship between book and his world move us to a deeper understanding of power?…

    • 406 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Sociology Amish society

    • 378 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Amish society is very different from American society. Both societies have different beliefs and value very different things. The Amish reject modern advances, while the rest of America is constantly striving for the latest technology. The Amish believe in humility and religion above most everything else in life. They have very simple lives and believe in surviving with just the necessities. They are very community and family oriented. Americans put more value on money, material possessions, becoming “successful,” and having fun. Most Americans are independent and fend for themselves, while the Amish work together as a community and are very close.…

    • 378 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Amish is a group of traditionalist Christians that rely on simple living, plain dress and refuse to adapt to modern technology. The history of the Amish started in Switzerland in 1693 led by Jakob Amman. Today majority of the traditional descendants of the Amish live in Pennsylvania and Ohio.…

    • 1542 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Robinson, B, A., (2004). The Amish, The early years in Europe. Retrieved September 10, 2005,…

    • 951 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    [30] Henry C. Smith, Smith 's Story of the Mennonites, Eugene: Wipf & Stock Publishers, 2005.…

    • 9509 Words
    • 39 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    The Amish faith sprung out of traditional Protestantism in the sixteenth century. Then referred to as Anabaptists, the Amish believed that baptism should not occur in children or infants, but only in adults that can make the decision for themselves (Kraybill, 2001). They also called for a separation between church and state, and a return to literal interpretation of the bible. Suffering extreme persecution for their beliefs, the Amish fled to northern Europe to escape harsh treatment from authorities and religious leaders alike (Fischetti, 1997). While living in these remote regions, the Amish grew dependent on agriculture for their livelihood. Agriculture has been the primary mode of Amish life ever since. Many Amish beliefs today are stemmed from their subsistence strategy of emerging agriculture.…

    • 1754 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Better Essays

    The Devil's Playground

    • 984 Words
    • 4 Pages

    structure; this period of time is demonstrated by the Amish before they join the church or…

    • 984 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Long extinct in Europe, the Amish subculture has fared well under the spirit of religious freedom and political accommodation given them in North America (Kraybill and Olshan, 1994). A sustained high fertility rate of seven children per family over the past century has contributed to a steadily growing population (Luthy, 1992; Ericksen et al, 1979). Of the estimated 176,550 Amish who live in the United States, almost 74 percent are considered "Old Order Amish" (Kraybill and Olshan, 1994; Hostetler and Huntington, 2001). Approximately 70 percent of the Amish population is concentrated in the states of Indiana, Ohio, and Pennsylvania, with the largest settlement in Holmes, Tuscarawas, and Wayne counties in northeastern Ohio (see Figure 1, a map of Amish church districts in the northeastern U.S.).…

    • 1395 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    ‘Witness’, an American film, directed by Australian director Peter Weir, is a film set in 1985 about a clash of modern American society, and an idyllic Amish community. Maeri Saeli describes it as “the two worlds meet, but never merge” This is shown in the interaction between ideas, characters and techniques that make an impact on the audience.…

    • 1202 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Cook, James I. The Church Speaks: Papers of the Commission on Theology Reformed Church in America. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2002.…

    • 4887 Words
    • 20 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Better Essays

    The origin of the Amish date back to the early 1600s. They are a group of Swiss Anabaptist who left Switzerland due to differences in beliefs of doctrinal baptisms. In Switzerland, the state/church required infant baptisms however this was not the practice of the Anabaptist, (aka Mennonites) who practiced adult baptisms. They were of the belief that one must make a conscious decision to be baptized and that only adults can make those types of decisions, not infants. In reading the article it stated that the Anabaptist actually performed two baptisms, once as an infant and then again as an adult when he or she made the decision to do so. As a result of religious differences between the state and the Anabaptist and the martyring of the group, this brought about the push-pull factors causing them to migrate to North America. By leaving Switzerland they were able to avoid blatant discrimination and being martyred for their religious practices. The persecution must have been intense as there are no Amish living in Europe today.…

    • 1270 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Even with the risk of leaving the Amish culture and being “shunned” the Amish of North America grew by about 12,000 from 2011 to 2012. Statistics show that the numbers increasing from an estimated 261,150 in 2011 to an estimated 273,700 in 20121. In the Amish culture where one was born and raised is usually where they will live as an adult. When counting the population it is not just the adults that are counted it is also the children. The growth of the communities are not just from family sizes increasing but also from converts coming into the Amish culture from the outside English world.…

    • 289 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Amish Religion Essay

    • 2375 Words
    • 10 Pages

    In the 18th century the Amish settled in American, However while doing so they split themselves from the Mennonite in to two separate groups; “Old Order” The Amish and “New Order” The Mennonite. The Mennonites have spread future through America than the Amish. The Amish have settled in a few states; such as Ohio, Pennsylvania, Iowa, Indiana, and Kansas.…

    • 2375 Words
    • 10 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    When people go to visit an Amish community on Sunday and spend a couple of hours with them, they simply love it. But when it comes to the question, whether they could you live happily in a lifestyle like the Amish, almost everyone would say NO. Because our society is based on material and selfishness concepts, they couldn’t live without all the material stuff. But what they don’t know is how great and awesome it is know that you have an entire community out there to support you whenever you need them, and they are not considered just your neighbors but you family. The Amish live a poor but grateful life with no needs for big material goods, but they are still happier than most. The Amish people speak words of wisdom and are the kindest; I admire how the keep their traditions alive, their simplicity and innocence, their whole way of life. Over the centuries America has changed and the society as well but despite all the time that has passed and the changes the Amish still have the same lifestyle had. They have maintained immutable their beliefs and traditions. Their peaceful mood is a reflection of God in their soul; their world is deeply spiritual; their world is God's world. Their top priority is to serve God, followed by their families. The Amish obey the Ordnung, which is a list or written rules that basically outlines all the aspect of Amish life and the basic of their faith families, and is a perfect way to live.…

    • 1014 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays

Related Topics