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Symbolism in Fahrenheit 451

By Lnherron77 Aug 29, 2006 731 Words
There are examples of symbolism in the book, Fahrenheit 451. There are several examples of symbolism for The Hearth and the Salamander, in the book Fahrenheit 451. The three main symbols that are being focused on are the salamander, the snake, and the names of the characters in the book. There are many examples of symbolism from The Hearth and the Salamander, in the book Fahrenheit 451 is now found in the next few paragraphs.

Salamanders have a significant place in The Hearth and the Salamander; part one of Fahrenheit 451. The meaning of salamander is "a mythical animal having the power to endure fire without harm." (Webster Dictionary, p: 1618). In the book Fahrenheit 451 the author, Ray Bradbury, uses salamander as a patch that Guy Montag is wearing on his firefighter uniform. "But he knew his mouth had only moved to day hello, and then when she seemed hypnotized by the salamander on his arm and the phoenix disc on his chest, he spoke again." (p: 6). Bradbury probably choose a salamander as Guy's patch because in Australia, salamanders live in the trees, and when an Aborigine tribe cut down trees to make fire wood, and threw the wood into the fire and saw that the salamanders busting out of the flames, they thought that the salamanders were being born in the flames of a fire. Montag, is a fireman, so if you really think hard, having a salamander as a fire station's logo is not a bad idea. Salamanders are important in this section of the book Fahrenheit 451 and possibly in the sections to come.

Another piece of symbolism in part one, The Hearth and the Salamander, of Fahrenheit 451 is the snake. The meaning of snake is "The many-headed monster that was slain by Hercules, and a constellation in the equatorial region of the southern sky near Cancer, Libra, and Centaurus." (Webster Dictionary, p: 1740). In the book Fahrenheit 451 the author, Ray Bradbury, uses the snake to describe the hose that Guy Montag is using to burn all the books. "With the brass nozzle in his fists, with great python spitting its venomous kerosene upon the world, the blood pounded in his head, and his hands were the hands of some amazing conductor playing all the symphonies of blazing and burning to bring down the tatters and charcoal ruins of history." (p: 3). Bradbury probably choose a snake because a snake is often referred to the satin and the Garden of Eden. Bradbury could have used the snake because he wanted to say that what Montag was doing was wrong, it was evil. Just like the snake, or satin, in the Garden of Eden. The snake is the second favorable sign of symbolism in part one, The Hearth and the Salamander, of Fahrenheit 451.

The final piece of symbolism that is important in The Hearth and the Salamander, in the book Fahrenheit 451, is the names of the characters. One of the character's names is Guy Montag. The meaning of Guy is "reborn." (Mrs.Gilmartin). This is used in the book Fahrenheit 451 as a main character's name, Guy Montag. Guy Montag is a fireman, but in his futuristic society, a fireman's job is to burn books since they are all illegal, and he enjoys his job. Ray Bradbury might have chosen this name for this character because; the character seems to be going through a state of change. Since Guy means reborn, Guy Montag character's personality might be reborn further on in the book. The name of characters is the final piece of symbolism in The Hearth and the Salamander, in the book Fahrenheit 451.

There are several examples of symbolism for The Hearth and the Salamander, in the book Fahrenheit 451. The three main symbols that are being focused on are the salamander, which means a mythical animal having the power to endure fire without harm. The snake, which means the many-headed monster that, was slain by Hercules, and a constellation in the equatorial region of the southern sky near Cancer, Libra, and Centaurus; and the names of the characters, which one of them (Guy) means reborn. There are many examples of symbolism from The Hearth and the Salamander, in the book Fahrenheit 451, and not all of them were displayed into this paper.

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