Struggles In Jane Eyre's Life

Good Essays
Jane’s life was full of strife and hardship, and she had many more mountains to climb than the other characters in Jane Eyre; but in the end, she had a life she was happy with. Jane’s struggles started very early in her life, she was orphaned and had to live with her abusive aunt. Jane’s aunt was rough, callous and unforgiving with Jane, as were her kids. When Jane turned ten years old, her aunt shipped her off to a school called Lowood. Jane at first was content with the change for she wouldn’t have to deal with the pain and fear that came along with living with her aunt, but her stay at Lowood did not go as she would’ve expected. At Lowood, Jane made a good friend by the name of Helen, but Helen soon fell ill and died. Jane stayed at Lowood

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Good Essays

    Jane Eyre, a Gothic novel by Charlotte Bronte, tells a story of a beauty and a beast. Jane Eyre grows up an orphaned girl in Victorian England who does not know love in her cruel aunt's household; after a few years her aunt sends her to a school where they abuse Jane further. After spending eight years as a student of Lowood and two as a teacher, she takes a nanny position where she meets Mr. Rochester, and sparks begin to fly. Bronte divides Jane's story into three significant sections, which have a different effect on Jane's life as seen at Gateshead, Lowood, and Thornfield .…

    • 328 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Jane Eyre was a nine year old orphan who lived with her aunt, Mrs. Reed. Mrs. Reed didn't want Jane, so therefore she was sent to Lowood Charity School to be disciplined. On her first few hours of being there, Jane finds out that only Mr. Brocklehurst, the master of the school, was the only one allowed to decide what happened there. One afternoon Jane decided to draw a portrait of who had become her friend, Helen Burns, and asked her to take off her cap to expose her beautiful red hair. When Mr. Brocklehurst saw that his rules were not being followed, he asked them to be taken in order. Since Jane was a rebel and thought that this was not righteous, she contradicted what he had ordered. As punishment, their hair had to be cut off. One of the kind women who worked there, Ms.…

    • 631 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Victorian mores are the unspoken rules known and observed by society. In the eighteen-hundreds several mores were very important including justice, Christianity, high standards of honesty and morality, and women’s roles. All good people are part of a family, a Christian family and women are to serve men as they stand unequal to them. Marriage is simply a tool to gain more money and connections, and only people of the same social class are worthy of each other. Whichever social class someone is born into they remain in unless of course they are rich or beautiful, the poor and plain are simply there to be the butlers, maids and governesses of those who are high up. Several of these mores are demonstrated and contradicted in Charlotte Bronte’s 1847 masterpiece Jane Eyre. Jane Eyre is the life story of a young heroin that faces incredible odds and terrible situations and still manages to follow her heart and morals through an exciting life that leads her to a blissful ending. Charlotte Bronte uses her narrative to display several of the Victorian mores and demonstrate why they’re important, and alternately disprove the significance of others.…

    • 1660 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    Charlotte Brontë’s novel, Jane Eyre was produced in the Victorian era, when social elitism was in its prime and there was great segregation between the upper and lower estates. The former was composed of the clergy and nobility and was defined by wealth, privileges and lavish lifestyles. The middle class, conversely, were the most frustrated by the exclusiveness of the upper estate. Possessing skill, intelligence and assertiveness, they believed that rank and power should derive from talent and merit, rather than from noble birth. Through the demonisation and infliction of a tragic downfall upon “Master Reed”, Brontë condemns the life of pleasure and honour, the lifelong inactivity so heavily indulged by those born into the aristocracy. By characterising Mr Brocklehurst as excessively and hypocritically pious, Brontë highlights the upper clergyman’s propensity to masquerade as a great nobleman, rather than to exercise the competence and benevolence integral to his role. Finally, Brontë implements a love of “servitude” and disdain for a “still … doom”, as well as the ambiguous social position of a governess in her protagonist, Jane Eyre, rendering her an agent for the middle class’ philosophy on worthiness of privilege. Ultimately, Brontë’s Jane Eyre calls for the reformation of the Victorian social structure as the extremities involved in social elitism ignore the inherent needs of man.…

    • 1068 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Jane strives to please the men in her her life, this started at a young age due to the detached love she held as a child. Jane’s parents both died when she was young and was brought in by her uncle to be raised with her cousins. Jane became the pupil her uncle never had, and because of this she was resented by her aunt Reed. The resentment Jane felt throughout…

    • 1294 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Jane Eyre Research Paper

    • 517 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Jane Eyre consists of several themes which all play a part in the novel, with religion being a major theme. The Christianity religion, more specifically, is one of the main themes. In this research paper I would like to examine the relationship between Jane Eyre and the Christianity religion. I also want to look at how Christianity plays its role in the novel. There are a few different types of Christianity represented by four characters in the novel; Mr. Brocklehurst, Helen, St. John, and the Jane herself. I want to look at how Jane’s religious beliefs evolved from the beginning of the novel until the end. I also want explore more into the religion of Christianity, and compare it with the other three characters already stated. One can view the different types of Christianity through these characters, and what it may sometimes look like. I would like to end the paper with answering the question, is Jane Eyre a Christian or just a spiritual person, and what research led me to this conclusion.…

    • 517 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Jane Eyre Research Paper

    • 613 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Gothic novels were around from 1764 until about 1820 the gothic novels were said to have started with the castle of otranto by Horace warpole in 1764. Some features that can define a gothic novel are things such as terror, mystery, the supernatural, doom, death, decay, haunted buildings, ghost's, madness, hereditary problems and so on. Jane Eyre is not a gothic novel but it seems to have elements which are like that of a gothic novel.…

    • 613 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Jane Eyre Research Paper

    • 1185 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Bronte's Jane Eyre is about love: a strong affection for or devotion to a person or persons (Webster 1070). For instance a dog will at first fall in love with you, and then it will hate you and again fall in love and live happily ever after. Love is a process and you must go through all the steps of this process in order to reach your ultimate goal of happiness. Love is something that we all must endure and desire. For some of us this can even be more of a challenge and perfection may never seem in reach.…

    • 1185 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Jane Eyre Research Paper

    • 1445 Words
    • 6 Pages

    In the novel Jane Eyre, author Charlotte Brontë emphasizes the religious aspect of life during the Victorian Era. Near the beginning of the preface Brontë states, “Conventionality is not morality. Self-righteousness in not religion”(Brontë, 1). With this statement, Brontë criticizes pseudo-religious manner in which many members of Victorian society live. She chastises her contemporaries for leading a life where empty words of justice and virtue are preceded by inconsistent behavior. Through the actions of the Reed family and Mr. Brocklehurst, Charlotte Brontë denounces the Victorian aristocracy for their self-righteous attitudes and their paltry treatment of members of lower social classes.…

    • 1445 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Jane Eyre Research Paper

    • 1483 Words
    • 6 Pages

    Many themes, styles, genres, and modes of Victorian Literature are reflected in the works of the Bronte Sisters', especially that of Jane Eyre. Common…

    • 1483 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Better Essays

    Jane Eyre Research Paper

    • 2119 Words
    • 9 Pages

    Love is a huge concept in Jane Eyre. Her entire life Jane looks for love whether it is the kind of love between family, friends, or a partner. Jane 's need for love is so great that, according to Charles Burkhart, "Love is a religion in Jane Eyre."(academic.brooklyn.cuny.edu) Many people judge Jane and don’t get along with her because they can’t see past her plain face or her unladylike mind and personality. Jane even points those things out in herself. Jane desires to find a life of independence in place of the love she can never seem to find. For Jane finding someone to love, in any type of way, and to love her back was hard to find. Jane tries to find her independence after all the love she has ever had is ripped away from her. “I desired…

    • 2119 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Jane Eyre Study Guide 1

    • 233 Words
    • 1 Page

    This study guide is meant to serve as an outline for independent study for “The Odyssey” Unit Exam. The Exam will be fifty questions total and will include the following testing formats: multiple choice, True/False, one essay question and matching. Student will need a #2 Pencil for testing.…

    • 233 Words
    • 1 Page
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Jane Eyre Research Paper

    • 1525 Words
    • 7 Pages

    The story of a woman who comes from the worst circumstances to grow and prosper by breaking the rules set for her is relevant in many different works of literature. Jane, the endearing heroine in Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre, breaks through barriers set for women during the Victorian Era.…

    • 1525 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    Jane Eyre Research Paper

    • 1079 Words
    • 5 Pages

    The coming-of-age novel has been a literary fixture for time immemorial. The genre first coined as the “bildungsroman” by an Estonian university professor in the 1820s (Swales 9) is said to be a novel driven by the development of the story’s protagonist. These stories are universal, appeal to a wide range of audiences, and are understandably popular with young readers. One of the more well-known examples, Jane Eyre, was first published in 1847 by Charlotte Brontë under the pseudonym of Currer Bell. This thrilling tale of forbidden love, dark secrets, and female empowerment has lasted the ages and charmed readers to the present day. Another bildungsroman by the name of Buttermilk Hill was published in 2004. Despite its marked similarities to…

    • 1079 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    “On that same occasion I learned, for the first time, from Miss Abbot’s communications to Bessie, that my father had been a poor clergyman; that my mother had married him against the wishes of her friends, who considered the match beneath her; that my grandfather Reed was so irritated at her disobedience, he cut her off without a shilling” (Bronte). The fiction novel “Jane Eyre” depicts Jane as a very opinionated person for her age. Bronte exploits the readers to loneliness and cruelty caused by one’s own family. Furthermore, the readers see Jane’s character develop as a child to a matured woman when she takes a position as governess at Thornfield Hall. Although she becomes governess, Jane develops feelings for her employer, Rochester which leads her to make a terrible choice. Bronte used elements such as, allusions, character analysis, and figurative language in order to address the theme of social…

    • 726 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays