Stanley Milgram Experiment Essay

Good Essays
In 1963, a Phycologist at Yale University, known as Stanley Milgram, provided one of the most famous studies of obedience in psychology. He conducted an experimentation concentrating on the dispute amongst a response to a direct order from a superior and the internal logic of what is right or wrong in one’s behaviors or motives, compelling towards right action. The principal objective was to see how far a human would go when an authority ordered them to kill an innocent individual. Milgram wanted to be precise if the Germans were complying their superior, a mutual clarification for the Nazi killing in World War II.
In 1963, a Phycologist at Yale University, known as Stanley Milgram, provided one of the most famous studies of obedience in psychology. He conducted an
…show more content…
The principal objective was to see how far a human would go when an authority ordered them to kill an innocent individual. Milgram wanted to be precise if the Germans were complying their superior, a mutual clarification for the Nazi killing in World War II.
In 1961, Phycologist Stanley Milgram began his trial, known as the Milgram experiment, to investigate the obedience to authority figures. The format in which he testified his experiment was by newspaper advertising for males to participate in a study of knowledge at Yale University. He gathered 40 females between the ages 20-50 where they were paid $4.50. At the beginning of the trial, they were introduced to another participant commonly being an ally of the experimenter. They selected a straw whether they would be the learner or the teacher-although the

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Good Essays

    Megan Randolph RC 250 Marcia Clay 11/3/09 A Summary of Stanley Milgram’s Obedience Study Stanley Milgram, a professor of social psychology, conducted a research study beginning in July of 1961. This research measured the willingness of participants to either obey or disobey an authority figuring giving them on a conflict between obedience to authority and personal conscience. Milgram set up this experiment at Yale University to test how much pain an ordinary citizen would inflict…

    • 797 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Stanley Milgram experiment takes normal everyday people and gives them orders to do horrible things. The test is to see if someone would do an awful act just on the basis of someone telling them to. This experiment speaks to the 'nature of responsibility' and to see if the subject will stop the experiment due to its dangerous nature. The subject is tricked into thinking they are the teacher, and the other person in the room, an actor, is the learner. The teacher will ask the learner a series…

    • 343 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Yale University psychologist, Stanley Milgram, conducted an experiment in 1961 focusing on the conflict between obedience to authority and personal conscience. He examined justifications for acts of genocide offered by those accused at the World War II Nuremberg War Criminal trials. Their defense often was based on "obedience" - that they were just following orders from their superiors. Milgram's experiment, which he told his participants was about learning, was to have participants (teacher) question…

    • 426 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Stanley Milgram Obedience Experiment One of the most famous studies of obedience in psychology was carried out by Stanley Milgram (1963). Stanley Milgram, a psychologist at Yale University, conducted an experiment focusing on the conflict between obedience to authority and personal conscience. He examined justifications for acts of genocide offered by those accused at the World War II, Nuremberg War Criminal trials. Their defense often was based on "obedience" - that they were just…

    • 1131 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Better Essays

    Stanley Milgram carried out one of the most famous studies of obedience in psychology. He was a psychologist at Yale University, conducting an experiment that focused on the conflict between obedience and morality. It showed that people have a strong tendency to obey with authority figures. Milgram was interested in researching how far people would go in obeying an order even if it involved harming another individual. He was fascinated on how easily ordinary people could be influenced in committing…

    • 954 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Stanley Milgram Essay

    • 1030 Words
    • 5 Pages

    1. What does Milgram’s study tell us about human behaviour? Yale University psychologist Stanley Milgram conducted the Milgram experiment, study to see the participants' willingness to obey an authority figure who instructed them to perform acts that differed with their conscience. The study is used to show the aim that Stanley Milgram himself placed to see the willingness of the participant to obey use pain if one of the participants got an answer wrong. Overall, 65% of the participants gave…

    • 1030 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Stanley Milgram

    • 369 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Stanley Milgram Stanley milgram: born august 15th, 1933. Died December 20th 1984 (aged 51) He was the middle of three children. Milgram attended James Monroe High School in New York City. He was also involved in his schools theatre productions, which later influenced the realistic experiences his subjects underwent in his experiments. Stanley Milgram attended Queens College in New York City. He then applied to Harvard’s department of social relations Ph.D. program, but was rejected on the basis…

    • 369 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Stanley Milgram Essay

    • 61 Words
    • 1 Page

    Stanley Milgram is one of the most prominent researchers that studied obedience in the field of Psychology. His experiment focused on the arising conflict between obeying an authority figure and personal conscience of an individual. The idea of the experiment was influenced by World War II, believing that soldiers kill other individuals because they are just following orders from their commanders.…

    • 61 Words
    • 1 Page
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    learning about the Stanley Milgram experiment, I found myself questioning why and how the majority of the subjects that participated in the experiment were willing to inflict apparent pain and injury on an innocent person, and found myself curious as to how I would react should I but put in the same situation. I believe that the most significant reason for this disturbing absence of critical thinking and moral responsibility is because the subjects involved in the experiment were blinded by authority…

    • 304 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Better Essays

    The Milgram Experiment

    • 1142 Words
    • 5 Pages

    The Milgram Experiment Stanley Milgram, a famous social psychologist, and student of Solomon Asch, conducted a controversial experiment in 1961, investigating obedience to authority (1974). The experiment was held to see if a subject would do something an authority figure tells them, even if it conflicts with their personal beliefs and morals. He even once said, "The social psychology of this century reveals a major lesson: often it is not so much the kind of person a man is as the kind of situation…

    • 1142 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Better Essays