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Smallpox Vaccine History

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Smallpox Vaccine History
“Vaccines are the most cost-effective healthcare interventions there are. A dollar spent on a childhood vaccination not only helps save a life, but greatly reduces spending on future healthcare” (Ezekiel Emanuel). Immunizations have revolutionized the world of science ever since they were first discovered. They now are fundamental to people’s survival. The first hope to a vaccine was created by Edward Jenner in 1796. Edward Jenner was the first to give a chance to those living with viral infectious diseases. He created the smallpox vaccine out of cowpox pustules. After extracting the pus inside the pustules, he injected it into a healthy 13-year old kid to give the body a little bit of the disease so it could build a resistance towards the …show more content…
During the 18th and 19th century the vaccine was perfected and in 1979 the disease was finally eradicated. During those years more vaccines and cures were developed like the cholera vaccine developed by Louis Pasteur, the plague vaccine, and a bacterial vaccine called Bacille Calmette Guerin. Many other scientists tried to create more vaccines like Alexander Glenny who perfected a method to inactivate tetanus toxin with formaldehyde. His method helped to developed the vaccine against diphtheria in 1926. Science and Technology kept advancing as time went on an many more cures for diseases were developed like polio, which was eradicated in 1950-1985. Currently doctors and scientists are trying to find a way to eliminate measles. Although vaccines have demonstrated to work, back then a group of people resisted to get them, because of that during the 1970s and 1980s vaccine manufacture was decreasing. That led to the implementation of the National Vaccine Injury Compensation programme, this was made in response to the threat to the vaccine supply due to DTP vaccine. In the next decades things advanced and the development of hepatitis B vaccine and new techniques for seasonal influenza vaccine were manufactured. Immunology is the study of immune system and anything related to it. Immunizations should be required in the United States school system because they are safe, effective, and they protect

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