Ruralisation of Urban Areas: Reversing Development in Zimbabwe

Powerful Essays
International Journal of Advanced Research in Management and Social Sciences

ISSN: 2278-6236

RURALISATION OF URBAN AREAS: REVERSING DEVELOPMENT IN ZIMBABWE
Jacob Mugumbate* Francis Maushe* Chamunogwa Nyoni, PhD*

Abstract: Urbanisation is on an upward trend in Zimbabwe as evidenced by expansion of urban centres. Notwithstanding advances towards urbanisation, some urban centres are actually de-urbanising or ruralising as witnessed by deteriorating livelihoods, services and infrastructure. Using observation, interviews and content analysis, researchers explored this phenomenon and concludes that ruralisation has increased. This paints a gloomy picture urbanisation and researchers recommend a review of current urban models in Zimbabwe. Keywords: Ruralisation, Urbanisation, Social Services, Development, Zimbabwe

*Department of Social Sciences, Bindura University of Science Education, Zimbabwe Vol. 2 | No. 7 | July 2013 www.garph.co.uk IJARMSS | 13

International Journal of Advanced Research in Management and Social Sciences

ISSN: 2278-6236

1.
1.1.

BACKGROUND INFORMATION
Introduction to the Study

This paper seeks to give an insight into the deterioration of urban environments in Zimbabwe. The gross fall in the quantity and quality of tangible and non-tangible services in urban services is in this paper referred as ruralisation. To explore this phenomenon, researchers used the qualitative research paradigm focusing on observation in severely affected areas in three urban areas. These were the capital city Harare, Chitungwiza and Bindura. The research undertaking was successful, discovering even more glaring decay in Zimbabwe urban life. This report begins with background information on urban and rural life before attempting to give light on ruralisation. It elaborates the aim of the study and explains the research methods employed. Following this appears a section presenting and analysing findings arranged on seven headings focusing on use of



References: 1. Centre for Public Accountability (2012). Local Government Authorities Bulawayo City Council Score Card March 2012. Document. 2. Chavunduka, G. L. (1994). Traditional Medicine in Modern Zimbabwe. Harare, University of Zimbabwe. 3. Chirisa, I. (2008). Population Growth and Rapid Urbanization in Africa: Implications for Sustainability. Journal of Sustainable Development in Africa, 10, 2, 23-29. 4. Government of Zimbabwe (1988). Rural Districts Councils Act Chapter 29:13. Act of Parliament. 5. Government of Zimbabwe (1995). Urban Councils Act Chapter 29:15. Act of Parliament. 6. Madhaka A (1995). Housing. In E. Kaseke(Ed.), Social Policy and Administration in Zimbabwe (pp 53-67). Harare, JSDA. 7. Mbetsa, F. S. (2002) Service Delivery Update for Period 1st-29th February 2012. Document. 8. Ministry of Health and Child Welfare (2012). Health Report 2011. Document. Vol. 2 | No. 7 | July 2013 www.garph.co.uk IJARMSS | 29 International Journal of Advanced Research in Management and Social Sciences ISSN: 2278-6236 9. Ministry of Local Government, Urban and Rural Development (2012). Report on Urban and Rural Councils. Document. 10. Muderere, T. (2011). Urban farming a mockery? [Online] Available: http://www.herald.co.zw/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=26697: urban-farming-a-mockery&catid=39:opinion-a-analysis&Itemid=132, (June 2, 2012). 11. Munzwa, K. M. and Jonga, W. (2010). Urban Development in Zimbabwe: A Human Settlement Perspective. Theoretical and Empirical Researches in Urban Management, 5, 14, 29-37. 12. Patel, D. (1988). Some Issues of Urbanisation in Zimbabwe. Journal of Social Development in Africa, 9, 2, 17-31. 13. Ramsamya, E. (1995). Socio‐economic Transition and Housing: Lessons from Zimbabwe. t. Development Southern Africa 12, 5, 18-33. 14. Tibaujuka A. K. (2005). Report of the Fact-Finding Mission to Zimbabwe to Assess the Scope and Impact of Operation Murambatsvina by the UN Special Envoy to Zimbabwe. Document. 15. United Nations (UN) (2007). State of the World Population. Geneva, UN. 16. WHO (2012). Zimbabwe Country Health Report 2011. Document. 17. Zimbabwe Statistics (2002). National Census Report. Document. Vol. 2 | No. 7 | July 2013 www.garph.co.uk IJARMSS | 30

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